Intercultural Extraneity
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Contex/nt of Real/Virtual Community Glossary 2

Amorphous: having no fixed form or shape
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/amorphous

Context collapse: is a concept used by those academics writing about the effects of social media. It refers to the infinite audiences possible online as opposed to the limited groups a person can normally interact with in face-to-face circumstances. In bounded interactions, people adjust their tone and presentation to fit the social context. In a situation of context collapse, this becomes impossible
Retrieved from: https://itlaw.wikia.org/wiki/Context_collapse#:~:text=Context%20collapse%20is%20a%20concept,face-to-face%20circumstances.

Context restoration: when people start backing away from broadcasting intimate details about themselves, it’s a sign that they’re looking to reestablish some boundaries in their social lives, to mend the walls that social media has broken
Retrieved from: http://www.roughtype.com/?p=8724

Content collapse: to deliver information that had required specialized mediums — newspapers and magazines, vinyl records and cassettes, radios, TVs, telephones, cinemas, etc. — through a single, universal medium. In the process, the formal standards and organizational hierarchies inherent to the old mediums began to disappear
Retrieved from: http://www.roughtype.com/?p=8724

To proliferate: to increase a lot and suddenly in number
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/proliferate

Finstas: – fake Instagram profiles
Retrieved from: http://www.roughtype.com/?p=8724

Content collapse: the tendency of social media to blur traditional distinctions among once distinct types of information — distinctions of form, register, sense, and importance
Retrieved from: http://www.roughtype.com/?p=8724

Conduit: a pipe or passage for water or electrical wires to go through; a way of connecting two places:
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/conduit

Haphazard: not having an obvious order or plan
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/haphazard

Mote: something, especially a piece of dust, that is so small it is almost impossible to see
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/mote

Herald: to be a sign that something important, and often good, is starting to happen, or to make something publicly known, especially by celebrating or praising it
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/herald

Category error/mistake: a mistake in which something is said or believed to be in one category (= group) when in fact it belongs to another
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/category-mistake?q=category+error

To render: to cause someone or something to be in a particular state
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/render

To consolidate: to become, or cause something to become, stronger, and more certain
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/consolidate

Tendentiousness: the quality of expressing or supporting a particular opinion that many people disagree with
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/tendentiousness

Malign: causing or intending to cause harm or evil
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/malign?q=maligned

To superimpose: to put especially a picture, words, etc. on top of something else, especially another picture, words, etc., so that what is in the lower position can still be seen, heard, etc.
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/superimpose

Zany: strange, surprising, or uncontrolled in a humorous way
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/zany

Blakeface: Used to refer to the practice of wearing make-up to imitate the appearance of a black person. The use of such make-up was associated with minstrel shows in the United States from the 1830s until the mid 20th century; it is now regarded as highly offensive
Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/blackface

Yellowface: the practice of white actors changing their appearance with make-up in order to play East Asian characters in films, plays, etc.
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/yellowface

Insidious: (of something unpleasant or dangerous) gradually and secretly causing harm
Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/insidious

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  1. The Latecomers 25 October 2020

    accrual:
    1. The act or process of accumulating; an increase.
    2. Something that accumulates or increases.
    Retrieved from:https://www.thefreedictionary.com/accrual

    candid – frank, ingenuous, outspoken; open and sincere; informal; unposed: a candid snapshot;
    Not to be confused with:
    candied – incrusted with sugar: candied fruit; prepared by cooking in sugar: candied yams; flattering: candied words
    Retrieved from:https://www.thefreedictionary.com/candid

    cottage industry- an industry whose labor force consists of family units or individuals working at home with their own equipment
    Retrieved from:https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cottage%20industry

    doom-scrolling – scrolling through one’s social media feeds for the most recent upsetting news about the latest catastrophe
    Retrieved from: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=doomscrolling

    epistemological– thebranch of philosophy that examines the nature of knowledge, its presuppositions and foundations, and its extent and validity.
    Retrieved from: https://www.thefreedictionary.com/epistemological

    ethos -The disposition, character, or fundamental values peculiar to a specific person, people, culture, or movement: “They cultivated a subversive alternative ethos” (Anthony Burgess).
    Retrieved from:https://www.thefreedictionary.com/ethos

    expressive individualism – a belief that each person has a unique core of feeling and intuition that should unfold or be expressed if individuality is to be realised
    Retrieved from: http://facultysites.vassar.edu/lenevare/archive/2008/soci235/bellah.htm

    the five WHYs – an iterative interrogative technique used to explore the cause-and-effect relationships underlying a particular problem, whereby each answer forms the basis of the next question
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_whys

    freeform stations –
    Freeform, or freeform radio, is a radio station programming format in which the disc jockey is given total control over what music to play, regardless of music genre or commercial interests. Freeform radio stands in contrast to most commercial radio stations, in which DJs have little or no influence over programming structure or playlists. In the United States, freeform DJs are still bound by Federal Communications Commission regulations.
    Retrieved from:https://www.definitions.net/definition/of

    free-market extremism (also market fundamentalism) – the exaggerated faith that when markets are left to operate on their own, they can solve all economic and social problems
    Retrieved from: http://www.longviewinstitute.org/projects/marketfundamentalism/marketfundamentalism/

    interface – a connection between two pieces of electronic equipment or between a person and a computer
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/interface

    legitimation – the process of legitimising something; = legalisation, formalisation, legitimisation, validation
    Retrieved from: https://www.macmillandictionary.com/us/dictionary/american/legitimation

    master narrative (also meta-narrative or grand narrative) – a narrative about narratives of historical meaning, experience or knowledge, which offers a society legitimation through the anticipated completion of a as yet unrealised master idea
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metanarrative

    meta – 1) showing or expressing an explicit awareness of itself or oneself as member of its category; 2) cleverly self-referential
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/meta

    meta skills – a high order skill that allows one to engage with functional expertise more effectively
    Retrieved from: https://liberationist.org/the-metaskills-you-need-to-thrive-in-the-21st-century/

    to redirect – 1) to change the direction of something, especially to send a letter to a new address; 2) to use money, assets, etc. for a different purpose from the one they were originally intended for
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/redirect

    RSS reader – stands for Really Simple Syndication and it’s is a simple, standardized content distribution method that can help you stay up-to-date with your favorite newscasts, blogs, websites, and social media channels. Instead of visiting sites to find new posts or subscribing to sites to receive notification of new posts.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lifewire.com/what-is-an-rss-feed-4684568#:~:text=RSS%20stands%20for%20Really%20Simple%20Syndication%20and%20it%E2%80%99s,favorite%20newscasts%2C%20blogs%2C%20websites%2C%20and%20social%20media%20channels

    to subsume –to classify or include in a more comprehensive category or under a general principle:
    “When late eighteenth-century Americans spoke of politics, they referred to a broad set of principles that they subsumed under the heading of republicanism” (Eric Foner).
    Retrieved from: https://www.thefreedictionary.com/subsuming

    surveillance capitalism – an economic system centred around the commodification of personal data with the core purpose of profit-making
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surveillance_capitalism

    to synthesise – to combine or produce by synthesis
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/synthesize

    taxonomy – the study of the general principles of scientific classificationsystematics
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/taxonomy

    yokes – To become joined.
    Retrieved from: https://www.thefreedictionary.com/yoked

  2. jams 26 October 2020

    1. Tribalism = a very strong feeling of loyalty to a political or social group, so that you support them whatever they do.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/tribalism

    2. Capitalism = an economic, political, and social system in which property, business, and industry are privately owned, directed towards making the greatest possible profits for successful organizations and people.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/capitalism

    3. Enlightenment = a European intellectual movement of the late 17th and 18th centuries emphasizing reason and individualism rather than tradition. It was heavily influenced by 17th-century philosophers such as Descartes, Locke, and Newton, and its prominent figures included Kant, Goethe, Voltaire, Rousseau, and Adam Smith.
    Retrieved from: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/enlightenment?s=t

    4. Virtual community = a social network of individuals who connect through specific social media, potentially crossing geographical and political boundaries in order to pursue mutual interests or goals.
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_community

    5. Culprit = someone who has done something wrong.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/culprit

    6. To flatten = to become level or cause something to become level.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/flatten

    7. To trivialize = to make something seem less important than it really is.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/trivialize

    8. To whitewash = to make something bad seem acceptable by hiding the truth.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/whitewash

  3. 3. j 26 October 2020

    1. to slander – a false spoken statement about someone that damages their reputation, or the making of such a statement.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/slander

    2. Libertarianism is a political philosophy and movement that upholds liberty as a core principle. Libertarians seek to maximize autonomy and political freedom, emphasizing free association, freedom of choice, individualism and voluntary association.
    Retrieved from : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarianism

    3.bipartisan
    (1) marked by or involving cooperation, agreement, and compromise between two major political parties
    (2) of, relating to, or involving members of two parties
    Retrieved from : https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bipartisan

    4. NPR – short for National Public Radio
    Retrieved from : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NPR

    5. FCC – short for Federal Communications Commision
    Retrieved from : https://www.fcc.gov/

    6. to affiliate – to cause a group to become part of or form a close relationship with another, usually larger, group, or organization
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/affiliate

    7. mainstream media -forms of the media, especially traditional forms such as newspapers, television, and radio rather than the internet, that influence large numbers of people and are likely to represent generally accepted beliefs and opinions
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/mainstream-media

    8. snout -the nose and mouth that stick out from the face of some animals
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/snout

  4. lumpenprol 27 October 2020

    (to) modulate
    transitive verb
    1: to tune to a key or pitch
    2: to adjust to or keep in proper measure or proportion : TEMPER
    3: to vary the amplitude, frequency, or phase of (a carrier wave or a light wave) for the transmission of information (as by radio)also : to vary the velocity of electrons in an electron beam
    intransitive verb
    1: to play or sing with modulation
    2: to pass from one musical key into another by means of intermediary chords or notes that have some relation to both keys
    3: to pass gradually from one state to another

    (to) undermine
    transitive verb
    1: to subvert or weaken insidiously or secretly trying to undermine his political rivals
    2: to weaken or ruin by degrees
    3: to wash away supporting material from under
    4: to excavate the earth beneath : form a mine under : SAP

    (to) homogenize
    transitive verb
    1a: to blend (diverse elements) into a mixture that is the same throughout
    b: to make uniform in structure or composition throughout : to make homogeneous
    2a: to reduce to small particles of uniform size and distribute evenly usually in a liquid
    b: to reduce the particles of so that they are uniformly small and evenly distributed specifically : to break up the fat globules of (milk) into very fine particles As a chemist, he developed equipment to homogenize milk— Matt Stiles
    intransitive verb
    : to become uniform in structure or composition throughout : to become homogenized

    (to) junk
    : to get rid of as worthless : SCRAP
    I’m junking this car.
    wind tunnel n.
    : a tunnel like passage through which air is blown at a known velocity to investigate air flow around an object (such as an airplane part or model) placed in the passage
    diminutive adj.
    1: (grammar) : indicating small size and sometimes the state or quality of being familiarly known, lovable, pitiable, or contemptible —used of affixes (such as -ette, -kin, -ling) and of words formed with them (such as kitchenette, manikin, duckling), of clipped forms (such as Jim), and of altered forms (such as Peggy)— compare AUGMENTATIVE
    2: exceptionally or notably small : TINY
    a diminutive performer

  5. lumpenprol 27 October 2020

    (to) modulate
    transitive verb
    1: to tune to a key or pitch
    2: to adjust to or keep in proper measure or proportion : TEMPER
    3: to vary the amplitude, frequency, or phase of (a carrier wave or a light wave) for the transmission of information (as by radio)also : to vary the velocity of electrons in an electron beam
    intransitive verb
    1: to play or sing with modulation
    2: to pass from one musical key into another by means of intermediary chords or notes that have some relation to both keys
    3: to pass gradually from one state to another

    (to) undermine
    transitive verb
    1: to subvert or weaken insidiously or secretlytrying to undermine his political rivals
    2: to weaken or ruin by degrees
    3: to wash away supporting material from under
    4: to excavate the earth beneath : form a mine under : SAP

    (to) homogenize
    transitive verb
    1a: to blend (diverse elements) into a mixture that is the same throughout
    b: to make uniform in structure or composition throughout : to make homogeneous
    2a: to reduce to small particles of uniform size and distribute evenly usually in a liquid
    b: to reduce the particles of so that they are uniformly small and evenly distributedspecifically : to break up the fat globules of (milk) into very fine particlesAs a chemist, he developed equipment to homogenize milk— Matt Stiles
    intransitive verb
    : to become uniform in structure or composition throughout : to become homogenized

    (to) junk
    : to get rid of as worthless : SCRAP
    I’m junking this car.

    wind tunnel n.
    : a tunnel like passage through which air is blown at a known velocity to investigate air flow around an object (such as an airplane part or model) placed in the passage

    diminutive adj.
    1: (grammar) : indicating small size and sometimes the state or quality of being familiarly known, lovable, pitiable, or contemptible —used of affixes (such as -ette, -kin, -ling) and of words formed with them (such as kitchenette, manikin, duckling), of clipped forms (such as Jim), and of altered forms (such as Peggy)— compare AUGMENTATIVE
    2: exceptionally or notably small : TINY
    a diminutive performer

  6. plusone 17 November 2020

    Education-Education is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits. Educational methods include teaching, training, storytelling, discussion and directed research. Education frequently takes place under the guidance of educators, however learners can also educate themselves. Education can take place in formal or informal settings and any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts may be considered educational. The methodology of teaching is called pedagogy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education
    Technology- (the study and knowledge of) the practical, especially industrial, use of scientific discoveries https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/technology
    News-information or reports about recent events https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/news
    Amusing-entertaining and funny https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/amusing
    Revolution-a change in the way a country is governed, usually to a different political system and often using violence or war https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/revolution
    Flood-to cause to fill or become covered with water, especially in a way that causes problems https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/flood
    Threat-1: an expression of intention to inflict evil, injury, or damage
    2: one that threatens
    3: an indication of something impending: the sky held a threat of rain https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/threat