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Master glossary: Our virtual community garden

As of this week, I will post the master glossary. Please add all vocabulary lists as comments to this post. At the end of the week, I will copy the most robust vocabulary list from the comments into this post.
As there is no assigned reading this week, apart from the weekly slide presentation, you can research what went into the creation of this week’s lecture (digital gardens (e.g.), web rings, the IndieWeb movement, Microblogging, Neocities, etc.)

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  1. miths 10 November 2020

    Activity stream – a list of recent activities performed by an individual, typically on a single website

    Affiliate marketing – a type of performance-based marketing in which a business rewards one or more affiliates for each visitor or customer brought by the affiliate’s own marketing efforts

    Consistency – the quality of always behaving or performing in a similar way, or of always happening in a similar way

    Critical mass – the minimum size or amount of resources required to start or maintain a venture

    Cross-promotion – a form of marketing promotion where customers of one product or service are targeted with promotion of a related product; a typical example is cross-media marketing of a brand; for example, Oprah Winfrey’s promotion on her television show of her books, magazines and website

    Cybersquatting (also known as domain squatting) – registering, trafficking in, or using an Internet domain name with bad faith intent to profit from the goodwill of a trademark belonging to someone else; the cybersquatter then offers to sell the domain to the person or company who owns a trademark contained within the name at an inflated price

    Digital garden – a metaphor for thinking about writing and creating that focuses less on the resulting “showpiece” and more on the process, care, and craft it takes to get there

    Engagement analytics – improving results from online marketing by measuring how engaged the online audience is with a specific brand

    GeoCities – a popular web hosting service that let people create and publish websites for free as well made it easy to browse such user-created websites by their theme or interest; site users selected a “city” in which to list the hyperlinks to their web pages; the “cities” were named after real cities or regions according to their content – for example, computer-related sites were placed in “SiliconValley” and those dealing with entertainment were assigned to “Hollywood”; hence the name of the site

    Hashtag – a number symbol (#) used to label keywords in a tweet; the name “hashtag” was coined by Twitter and combines the word “hash” (another name for the number symbol) and “tag,” since it is used to tag certain words
    Hub – the effective centre of an activity, region, or network

    IndieWeb – a community of people building software to enable personal, independently hosted websites to independently maintain their social data on their own web domains rather than on large, centralized social networking services

    Microblogging – a combination of instant messaging and content production; with a microblog, you share short messages with an online audience to improve engagement

    Navigation bar (or navigation system) – a section of a graphical user interface intended to aid visitors in accessing information; they are implemented in file browsers, web browsers and as a design element of some web sites

    Nuance – a subtle difference in or shade of meaning, expression, or sound

    Rabbit hole – used to refer to a bizarre, confusing, or nonsensical situation or environment, typically one from which it is difficult to extricate oneself

    Ringmaster (a single moderator) – in charge of approving and adding each website to a webring

    Search engine – a program that searches for and identifies items in a database that correspond to keywords or characters specified by the user, used especially for finding particular sites on the World Wide Web

    Search engine optimization (SEO) – the process of improving the quality and quantity of website traffic to a website or a web page from search engines; webrings can be considered a search engine optimization technique

    Social media engagement – the public shares, likes and comments for the social media efforts of an individual or an online business

    Tenet – a principle, belief, or doctrine generally held to be true especially : one held in common by members of an organization, movement, or profession

    To engage – to interest someone in something and keep them thinking about it

    To revamp – give new and improved form, structure, or appearance to something

    Web page – documents written in HTML (hypertext markup language) translated by a Web browser that make up the World Wide Web

    Webring (or web ring) – a collection of websites linked together in a circular structure, and usually organized around a specific theme, often educational or social

  2. powerpuff2 10 November 2020

    Taken from: https://www.technologyreview.com/2020/09/03/1007716/digital-gardens-let-you-cultivate-your-own-little-bit-of-the-internet/

    Digital garden- The phrase “digital garden” is a metaphor for thinking about writing and creating that focuses less on the resulting “showpiece” and more on the process, care, and craft it takes to get there.
    source: https://joelhooks.com/digital-garden#:~:text=The%20phrase%20%22digital%20garden%22%20is,it%20takes%20to%20get%20there.&text=Gardens%20can%20be%20very%20personal,source%20of%20food%20and%20substance.

    Eschew- to avoid something intentionally, or to give something up
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/eschew

    one-size-fits-the idea that one set of rules, one solution, etc. is suitable for any situation
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/size?q=one+size+fits+all

    revamping- to change or arrange something again, in order to improve it
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/revamp

    tooling-the process of getting, making, or using the right equipment for a particular purpose
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/tooling

    back-end code-The back-end is the code that runs on the server, that receives requests from the clients, and contains the logic to send the appropriate data back to the client. The back-end also includes the database, which will persistently store all of the data for the application.
    source:https://www.codecademy.com/articles/back-end-architecture#:~:text=The%20back%2Dend%20is%20the,the%20data%20for%20the%20application.

    niche- a job or position that is very suitable for someone, especially one that they like;an area or position that is exactly suitable for a small group of the same type
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/niche

    hypertext- a way of writing and showing text on a website or computer document so that if you click on that text, you will go to a different website, a different part of the document, etc.
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/hypertext

    weblogs- a weblog, sometimes written as web log or Weblog, is a Web site that consists of a series of entries arranged in reverse chronological order, often updated on frequently with new information about particular topics.
    source:https://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/weblog

    time-stamped-a stamping device used for recording the date and time of day on a document, envelope, etc. (as to indicate when it was received or sent out)
    source:https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/time%20stamp

    iterative(learning)- doing something again and again, usually to improve it
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/iterative

    backlash- a strong feeling among a group of people in reaction to a change or recent events in society or politics
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/backlash

    misinformation and disinformation- 1) wrong information, or the fact that people are misinformed; 2)false information spread in order to deceive people
    source(1):https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/misinformation
    source(2):https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/disinformation

    daunting-making you feel slightly frightened or worried about your ability to achieve something
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/daunting

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Taken from: https://boffosocko.com/2017/07/28/an-introduction-to-the-indieweb/

    IndieWeb-IndieWeb is a community of people building software to enable personal, independently hosted websites to independently maintain their social data on their own web domains rather than on large, centralized social networking services.
    source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IndieWeb

    micro-slice-An extremely small slice
    source:https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/microslice

    fragmentation-the action or process of breaking something into small parts or of being broken up in this way;a situation in which an industry or business activity has many companies but no one company is more important than the others
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fragmentation

    onerous-difficult to do or needing a lot of effort
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/onerous

    decentralized(internet)-used to describe organizations or their activities which are not controlled from one central place, but happen in many different places
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/decentralized

    legalese-language used by lawyers and in legal documents that is difficult for ordinary people to understand
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/legalese

    recourse-using something or someone as a way of getting help, especially in a difficult or dangerous situation
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/recourse

    troll-someone who leaves an intentionally annoying or offensive message on the internet, in order to upset someone or to get attention or cause trouble
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/troll

    cookie-cutter (ideas)-If you describe something as having a cookie-cutter approach or style, you mean that the same approach or style is always used and not enough attention is paid to individual differences

    (sites)get/be acquired-to buy or take control of a company or part of a company, often by buying shares in it;to get the legal right to use or do something
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/acquire?q=acquired

    site downtime/server outage-When a website or web service is not available online or doesn’t function well enough for end users to complete a task, the site is considered to be experiencing downtime.
    source: https://www.uptrends.com/what-is/website-downtime#:~:text=When%20a%20website%20or%20web,considered%20to%20be%20experiencing%20downtime.&text=Although%20technology%20has%20improved%20and,unforeseen%20circumstances%20still%20cause%20downtime.

    scalability (issues)-Scalability is an attribute that describes the ability of a process, network, software or organization to grow and manage increased demand. A system, business or software that is described as scalable has an advantage because it is more adaptable to the changing needs or demands of its users or clients.
    source: https://www.techopedia.com/definition/9269/scalability#:~:text=Scalability%20is%20an%20attribute%20that,of%20its%20users%20or%20clients.

    silos (silo service)-In business management and information technology (IT) an information silo is a management system that is unable to operate with any other system. Because of these conditions, information is not adequately shared but rather remains secluded within each system or subsystem
    source: https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/I/information_silo.html#:~:text=In%20business%20management%20and%20information,operate%20with%20any%20other%20system.&text=Because%20of%20these%20conditions%2C%20information,within%20each%20system%20or%20subsystem.

    syndicate(your content)-to sell newspaper or magazine articles, photographs, television shows, etc. to other organizations so that they can be published or shown in several places
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/syndicate

    domain-a set of websites on the internet that end with the same letters, for example .com, .org, .net, and .edu etc.
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/domain

    domain name registrar-A domain name registrar is a company that manages the reservation of Internet domain names. A domain name registrar must be accredited by a generic top-level domain (gTLD) registry or a country code top-level domain (ccTLD) registry
    source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_name_registrar#:~:text=A%20domain%20name%20registrar%20is,level%20domain%20(ccTLD)%20registry.

    permalink URL:The permalink is the full URL you see – and use – for any given post, page or other pieces of content on your site. It’s a permanent link, hence the name permalink.
    source:https://yoast.com/what-is-a-permalink/#:~:text=The%20permalink%20is%20the%20full,link%2C%20hence%20the%20name%20permalink.&text=A%20simple%20permalink%20makes%20a%20URL%20easy%20to%20understand%20and%20share.

    ubiquitous-seeming to be everywhere
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/ubiquitous

    CMS-CMS is computer software or an application that uses a database to manage all content, and it can be used when developing a website
    source:https://www.atinternet.com/en/glossary/cms/#:~:text=CMS%20stands%20for%20content%20management,used%20when%20developing%20a%20website.

    overhead(n.)-the regular and necessary costs, such as rent and heating, that are involved in operating a business
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/overhead

    Post On your Own Site Syndicate Elsewhere(Posse)- the practice of posting content on your own site first, then publishing copies or sharing links to third parties (like social media silos) with original post links to provide viewers a path to directly interacting with your content.
    source:https://indieweb.org/POSSE#:~:text=POSSE%20is%20an%20abbreviation%20for,directly%20interacting%20with%20your%20content.

    backfeed-is the process of syndicating interactions on your POSSE copies back (AKA reverse syndicating) to your original posts
    source:https://indieweb.org/backfeed

    webmention- is a web standard for mentions and conversations across the web, a powerful building block that is used for a growing federated network of comments, likes, reposts, and other rich interactions across the decentralized social web
    source:https://indieweb.org/Webmention

    building block-something that is necessary for making or developing another thing
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/building-block

    RSVP-“répondez s’il vous plaît”, French for “please reply”; used at the end of a written invitation to mean that you should let the people who invited you know whether or not you are coming:
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/rsvp

    itches-n the context of the indieweb, are individuals’s personal sources of annoyances using the web or in particular their own website, that they use to itemize and prioritize what to create, design, build, and improve on their own website, often by first listing such “itches” on a section in their User: page or on their own website
    source:https://indieweb.org/itches

    monoculture-a culture that is the same in many different places
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/monoculture

    selfdogfood-is the act of using your own creations and depending on them personally yourself, beyond just self-testing or dogfooding a work project; on the IndieWeb, it means using your creations on your personal site as an aspect of your primary online identity, day to day
    source:https://indieweb.org/selfdogfood

    expertise-a high level of knowledge or skill
    source:https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/expertise

  3. plusone 11 November 2020

    Portable-light and small enough to be easily carried or moved https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/portable
    Keepsake-a small present, usually not expensive, that is given to you by someone so that you will remember that person https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/keepsake
    Quilt-a decorative cover for a bed https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/quilt
    Weaver-a person whose job is weaving cloth and other materials (= making them by crossing threads over and under each other) https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/weaver
    The Amish-members of a religious group in the US who live in a simple traditional way that often involves farming and no modern technology https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/amish
    Calico-a heavy plain cloth made from cotton https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/calico
    Chintz-cotton cloth, usually with patterns of flowers, that has a slightly shiny appearance https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/chintz

  4. jana 11 November 2020

    Comment:

    IndieWeb movement – a community of people building software to enable personal, independently hosted websites to independently maintain their social data on their own web domains rather than on large, centralized social networking services. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IndieWeb#:~:text=IndieWeb%20is%20a%20community%20of%20people%20building%20software,rather%20than%20on%20large%2C%20centralized%20social%20networking%20services.

    distributed social network – an Internet social networking service that is decentralized and distributed across distinct providers (something like email but for social networks), such as the Fediverse or the IndieWeb
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distributed_social_network

    Collaborative project management – a method used to plan, coordinate, control, and monitor distributed and complex projects.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collaborative_project_management

    iterative thinking – a procedure in which repetition of a sequence of operations yields results successively closer to a desired result
    https://lowrysolutions.com/blog/how-to-be-iterative-in-your-thinking/

    brainstorming – a group problem-solving technique that involves the spontaneous contribution of ideas from all members of the group
    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/brainstorming

    digital garden – a metaphor for thinking about writing and creating that focuses less on the resulting “showpiece” and more on the process, care, and craft it takes to get there ; “With digital gardening, you’re talking to yourself. You focus on what you want to cultivate over time.”
    https://www.technologyreview.com/2020/09/03/1007716/digital-gardens-let-you-cultivate-your-own-little-bit-of-the-internet/

    virtual community – a social network of individuals who connect through specific social media, potentially crossing geographical and political boundaries in order to pursue mutual interests or goals.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_community

    assaying – to analyze (something, such as an ore) for one or more specific components
    https://www.dictionary.com/browse/assaying

    nuance – a very slight difference in appearance, meaning, sound, etc.
    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/nuance

    digital age – the present time, in which many things are done by computer and large amounts of information are available because of computer technology
    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/digital-age

    constructive practice – practice which helps us improve; promoting further development or advancement (opposed to destructive)

    attention economy – the collective human capacity to engage with the many elements in our environments that demand mental focus. The term reflects an acknowledgement that the human capacity for attention is limited and that the content and events vying for that attention far exceed that capacity.
    https://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/attention-economy

    cancel culture – the popular practice of withdrawing support for (canceling) public figures and companies after they have done or said something considered objectionable or offensive. Cancel culture is generally discussed as being performed on social media in the form of group shaming.
    https://www.dictionary.com/e/pop-culture/cancel-culture/#:~:text=Cancel%20culture%20refers%20to%20the%20popular%20practice%20of,social%20media%20in%20the%20form%20of%20group%20shaming.

    civics – a social science dealing with the rights and duties of citizens
    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/civics

    neocities – a free web hosting service. Offering 1 GB of storage space and no server-side scripting, the service’s expressed goal is to revive the support of “creativity and free expression”
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neocities

    web rings – a way of interlinking related Web sites so that you can visit each site one after the other, eventually (if you keep going) returning to the first Web site.
    https://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/Web-ring-Webring#:~:text=A%20Web%20ring%20%28or%20Webring%29%20is%20a%20way,keep%20going%29%20returning%20to%20the%20first%20Web%20site.

  5. plusone 11 November 2020

    Community- the people living in one particular area or people who are considered as a unit because of their common interests, social group, or nationality https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/community
    Copyright- the legal right to control the production and selling of a book, play, film, photograph, or piece of music https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/copyright
    Cancel culture- Cancel culture (or call-out culture) is a modern form of ostracism in which someone is thrust out of social or professional circles online on social media, in the real world, or both. Those who are subject to this ostracism are said to be “canceled.” Merriam-Webster defines cancel as “to stop giving support to that person,” and Dictionary.com defines it as “withdrawing support for (canceling) public figures and companies after they have done or said something considered objectionable or offensive.” The expression “cancel culture” has mostly negative connotations and is commonly used in debates on free speech and censorship. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancel_culture
    App- a computer program that is designed for a particular purpose https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/app
    System- a set of connected things or devices that operate together https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/system
    Software- the instructions that control what a computer does; computer programs https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/software
    Portable-light and small enough to be easily carried or moved https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/portable

  6. lumpenprol 12 November 2020

    P.B.L. – project-based learning

    to check out (during something) – when you are no longer interested in something

    to scrap – to get rid of something that is no longer useful or wanted, often using its parts in new ways
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/scrap

    empathetic – having the ability to imagine how someone else feels
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/empathetic

    to facilitate – to make something possible or easier
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/facilitate

    perseverance – continued effort and determination
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/perseverance

    subpar – used to describe something that is below average, or below what is expected
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/subpar

    to embed – to incorporate/include something

    scaffolding – a structure of metal poles and wooden boards put against a building for workers to stand on when they want to reach the higher parts of the building
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/scaffolding

    to curate – to be in charge of selecting something (e.g. films, performers, music)
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/curate

    rubric – a set of instructions, especially on an exam paper, usually printed in a different style or colour
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/rubric

    self-efficacy – a person’s belief that they can be successful when carrying out a particular task
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/self-efficacy

    appliquéd – decorated with pieces of cloth sewn or stuck on; sewn or stuck on to something as a decoration
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/appliqued?q=appliqu%C3%A9d

    to embroider – to decorate cloth or clothing with patterns or pictures consisting of stitches that are sewn directly onto the material
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/embroider

    to imbue something/someone with something – to fill something or someone with a quality or feeling
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/imbue-something-someone-with-something

    batting – layers or sheets of raw cotton or wool or of synthetic fibrous material used for lining quilts or for stuffing or packaging; a blanker of thermal insulation (such as fiberglass)
    source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/batting

    valance – a short piece of material that hangs down, usually around the base of a bed
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/valance

    chintz – a printed calico from India; a usually glazed printed cotton fabric
    source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chintz

    damask – a type of heavy cloth that has a pattern woven into it that is the same colour as the cloth
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/damask

    ethos – the set of beliefs, ideas, etc. about the social behaviour and relationships of a person or group
    source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/ethos

  7. chickclique 13 November 2020

    self-examination – thought that you give to your own character and actions, for example in order to judge whether you have been behaving in a way that is acceptable to your own set of values. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/self-examination)

    self-criticism – unfavourable or severejudgment of oneself, one’s abilities, one’s actions, etc. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/self-criticism)

    self-understanding – the ability to understand one’s own actions. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/self-understanding)

    self-interest – one’s personal interest or advantage. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/self-interest)

    self-improvement – the improvement of one’s status, position, education, etc, by one’s own efforts. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/self-improvement)

    kudos – admiration or recognition that someone or something gets as a result of a particular action or achievement. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/kudos)

    stumbling block – a problem which stops you from achieving something. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/stumbling-block)

    step on someone’s toes – to offend someone, esp. by trespassing or intruding on prerogatives or rights. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/step-on-someones-toes)

    opportunism – the practice or policy of adapting one’s actions, judgments, etc. to circumstances, as in politics, in order to further one’s immediate interests, without regard for basic principles or eventualconsequences. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/opportunism)

    civics – the study of the rights and duties of the citizens of a society. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/civics)

    iterative – repetitious or frequent. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/iterative)

    Flow Theory – explains what happens when we hit that place of “optimal experience,” where you are fully engaged, present, and focused. (http://www.spencerauthor.com/flow-theory/)

    UX Design Theory – focuses on the user experience of a platform. (http://www.spencerauthor.com/ux/)

    interdependence- the condition of a group of people or things that all depend on each other. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/interdependence)

    excel – if someone excelsin something or excelsat it, they are very good at doing it. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/excel)

    Creative Fluency – typically, experts define creative fluency as the speed and ease of generating new creative ideas. (http://www.spencerauthor.com/developing-creative-fluency-in-students/)

    endurance – the ability to continue with an unpleasant or difficultsituation, experience, or activity over a long period of time. (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/endurance)

  8. witspur 13 November 2020

    1. Blogosphere – an umbrella term for all blogs ever written.

    2. Digital garden – a metaphor for thinking about writing and creating that focuses less on the resulting “showpiece” and more on the process, care, and craft it takes to get there.

    3. HTTP – Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) – an application layer protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypermedia information systems. HTTP is the foundation of data communication for the World Wide Web, where hypertext documents include hyperlinks to other resources that the user can easily access, for example by a mouse click or by tapping the screen in a web browser.

    4. Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) – a standard markup language for documents designed to be displayed in a web browser. It can be assisted by technologies such as Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and scripting languages such as JavaScript.

    5. Hypertext – a text displayed on a computer display or other electronic devices with references (hyperlinks) to other text that the reader can immediately access. Hypertext documents are interconnected by hyperlinks, which are typically activated by a mouse click, keypress set or by touching the screen. Apart from text, the term “hypertext” is also sometimes used to describe tables, images, and other presentational content formats with integrated hyperlinks.

    6. Indie Web – a community of people building software to enable personal, independently hosted websites to independently maintain their social data on their own web domains rather than on large, centralized social networking services.

    7. Markup language – a system for annotating a document in a way that is syntactically distinguishable from the text, meaning when the document is processed for display, the markup language is not shown, and is only used to format the text.

    8. Microblog – a short piece of content designed for quick audience interactions.

    9. Neocities – (a portmanteau of the prefix neo- and GeoCities) is a free web hosting service. Offering 1 GB of storage space and no server-side scripting, the service’s expressed goal is to revive the support of “creativity and free expression” provided by GeoCities before its shutdown in the US and Japan in 2009 and 2019, respectively

    10. Off-Page/On-Page SEO – Search Engine Optimization that’s done to generate more awareness for your blog. Off-page SEO focused on promoting your content through activities like sharing on social media, while on-page SEO is all about optimizing the individual posts & pages of your blog to be friendly in the eyes of search engines.

    11. Organic Search Result (OSR) – The blog posts on your site that reach rankings for their respective keyword phrases on Google’s search engine result pages.

    12. Permalinks – also known as a “permanent link” is a URL (of a specific blog post or page on your site) that should remain unchanged once the page is published. Permalinks should always be SEO-friendly URLs that are both easy for people to remember and for search engines to make sense of.

    13. Script language is a programming language for a special run-time environment that automates the execution of tasks; the tasks could alternatively be executed one-by-one by a human operator.

    14. SEO (Search Engine Optimization) – a process used to improve your blog’s rankings in search engine result pages.

    15. Server-side scripting – a technique used in web development which involves employing scripts on a web server which produce a response customised for each user’s (client’s) request to the website.

    16. Traffic – The number of visitors a blog receives within a given time period.

    17. Troll – Someone who leaves a negative comments on your blog post, just for fun or to incite a reaction out of you

    18. Web browser – (commonly referred to as a browser) is a software application for accessing information on the World Wide Web. When a user requests a web page from a particular website, the web browser retrieves the necessary content from a web server and then displays the page on the user’s device.

    19. Web hosting service – type of Internet hosting service that allows individuals and organizations to make their website accessible via the World Wide Web.

    20. Web page (or webpage) a specific collection of information provided by a website and displayed to a user in a web browser. A website typically consists of many web pages linked together in a coherent fashion. The name “web page” is a metaphor of paper pages bound together into a book.

    21. Web server – a server software, or hardware dedicated to running this software, that can satisfy client requests on the World Wide Web. A web server can, in general, contain one or more websites. A web server processes incoming network requests over HTTP and several other related protocols.

    22. Webring – collection of websites linked together in a circular structure, and usually organized around a specific theme, often educational or social.

    23. World Wide Web (WWW) – commonly known as the Web, is an information system where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs, such as https://example.com/), which may be interlinked by hypertext, and are accessible over the Internet. The resources of the Web are transferred via the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), may be accessed by users by a software application called a web browser, and are published by a software application called a web server. The World Wide Web is not synonymous with the Internet, which pre-existed the Web in some form by over two decades and upon whose technologies the Web is built.

  9. djaks 14 November 2020

    1. SOCIAL COMMUNICATION- refers to language that is used in social situations. This refers to a child’s ability to use language to interact with others in a variety of situations. It is the ability to take the perspective of another and modify language use accordingly.
    Source: https://www.wellscreening.com/skills/social-communication#:~:text=Social%20Communication%20refers%20to%20language,Theory%20of%20Mind%2DToM).

    2. CODE-OF-CONDUCT- is a set of rules outlining the norms, rules and responsibilities or proper practices of an individual party or organization.
    Source; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_conduct

    3. PROTOTYPE- the first example of something, such as a machine or industrial product, from which all later forms are developed.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/prototype?q=prototype+

    4. CONTENT MARKETING- Content marketing is a strategic marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and consistent content to attract and retain a clearly defined audience — and, ultimately, to drive profitable customer action.
    Source: https://contentmarketinginstitute.com/what-is-content-marketing/

    5. POST-something such as a message or picture that you publish on a website or using social media.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/post

    6. SURVEY- an examination of opinions, behaviour, etc..made by asking people questions.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/survey

    7. BITE-SIZED- small or short enough to be easy to understand , remember or deal with at the same time.
    Source; https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/bite-sized?q=bite-+sized

    8. TWITTER- the name of a microblogging social media service where people or organizations can publish short remarks or pieces of information, and where you can see information published by people or organizations that you choose
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/twitter

    9. TUMBLR- is an American microblogging and social networking website , which allows its users to post multimedia and other content to a short-form blog.
    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tumblr

    10. GIF -a type of computer file that contains a still or moving image. GIF is the abbreviation for “Graphic Interchange Format”
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/gif

    11. MEME -a cultural feature or a type of behaviour that is passed from one generation to another, without the influence of genes.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/meme

    12. INFOGRAPHIC – a picture or diagram or a group of pictures or diagrams showing or explaining information
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/infographic

  10. j 15 November 2020

    Online Community – also called an internet community or web community, is a community, whose members interact with each other primarily via the Internet. For many, online communities may feel like home, consisting of a “family of invisible friends”.[1] Those who wish to be a part of an online community usually have to become a member via a specific site and thereby gain access to specific content or links
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Online_community

    Infographic – graphic visual representations of information, data, or knowledge intended to present information quickly and clearly
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infographic

    Support Community – provides technical support to the consumers of your products or services
    Retrieved from: https://www.cyberius.com/blog/news/why-should-we-build-a-digital-community-infographic/

    Internal Community – uses collaborative features with your existing business systems (chat rooms, file storage, etc.)
    Retrieved from: https://www.cyberius.com/blog/news/why-should-we-build-a-digital-community-infographic/

    Media Community – allows users to share news and content about a company
    Retrieved from: https://www.cyberius.com/blog/news/why-should-we-build-a-digital-community-infographic/

    Topical Community – used to address a specific topic or related topics – this allows customers to voice their opinions
    Retrieved from: https://www.cyberius.com/blog/news/why-should-we-build-a-digital-community-infographic/

    Developer Community – empowers developers to find quick-solution paths concerning technical issues
    Retrieved from: https://www.cyberius.com/blog/news/why-should-we-build-a-digital-community-infographic/

    Gaming Community – an online platform where members can share gaming experience, game plans, and the formation of teams
    Retrieved from: https://www.cyberius.com/blog/news/why-should-we-build-a-digital-community-infographic/

    Crowdsource – to give tasks to a large group of people or to the general public, for example, by asking for help on the internet, rather than having tasks done within a company by employees
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/crowdsource

    Whimsy – unusual, funny, and pleasant ideas or qualities
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/whimsy

    Taxonomist – a biologist that groups organisms into categories
    Retrieved from: https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/taxonomist

    AD HOC – made or happening only for a particular purpose or need, not planned before it happens
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/ad-hoc

    To paginate – to create pages, as with a word-processing program
    Retrieved from: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/paginated

    Repository – a place where things are stored and can be found
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/repository

    Roam – web-based tool to maintain a personal set of interlinked and daily notes
    Retrieved from: https://medium.com/@tschoffelen/digital-gardens-33c57292fa11

    Obsidian – similar to the Roam, but in the form of a desktop app that has some cool features, including a visual representation of your network of notes
    Retrieved from: https://medium.com/@tschoffelen/digital-gardens-33c57292fa11

    To faff about/around – to spend your time doing a lot of things that are not important instead of the thing that you should be doing
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/faff-about-around

    To defrag – to consolidate fragmented files and folders on (the hard drive of a computer or other electronic device) in order to make it run more efficiently
    Retrieved from: https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/defrag

    Prescient – having prescience, or knowledge of things or events before they exist or happen; having foresight
    Retrieved from: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/prescient

    To eschew – to avoid something intentionally, or to give something up
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/eschew

    To revamp – to change or arrange something again, in order to improve it
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/revamp

    An umbrella term – A word that groups other words into a single common category
    Retrieved from: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=umbrella%20term

    Sources:
    1. https://www.cyberius.com/blog/news/why-should-we-build-a-digital-community-infographic/
    2. https://joelhooks.com/digital-garden
    3. https://medium.com/@tschoffelen/digital-gardens-33c57292fa11
    4. https://maggieappleton.com/garden-history
    5. https://www.technologyreview.com/2020/09/03/1007716/digital-gardens-let-you-cultivate-your-own-little-bit-of-the-internet/

  11. maverick 15 November 2020

    Big Tech – refers to the major technology companies such as Apple, Google, Amazon and Facebook
    https://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Big+Tech
    Digital literacy – refers to an individual’s ability to find, evaluate, and compose clear information through writing and other media on various digital platforms
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_literacy
    Blogstream – the publication on the internet of content from weblogs rather than from mainstream media sources
    https://www.dictionary.com/browse/blogstream
    Bots – a software program that can execute commands, reply to messages, or perform routine tasks, as online searches, either automatically or with minimal human intervention (often used in combination)
    https://www.dictionary.com/browse/bot
    Clickbait – articles, photographs, etc. on the internet that are intended to attract attention and encourage people to click on links to particular websites
    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/clickbait
    Domain name – an identification string that defines a realm of administrative autonomy, authority or control within the Internet.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_name
    Deep linking – a type of link that send users directly to an app instead of a website or a store.
    https://www.adjust.com/glossary/deep-linking/
    Keyword stuffing – the practice of inserting a large number of keywords into Web content and meta tags in the attempt to artificially increase a page’s ranking in search results and drive more traffic to the site.
    https://searchitchannel.techtarget.com/definition/keyword-stuffing

  12. md 16 November 2020

    digital age – the present time, in which many things are done by computer and large amounts of information are available because of computer technology (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/digital-age)
    constructive – intended to help someone or improve understanding (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/constructive)
    ethic – a system of accepted beliefs that control behaviour, especially such a system based on morals (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/ethic?q=ethical)
    social network – a website or computer program that allows people to communicate and share information on the internet using a computer or mobile phone (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/social-network?q=social+networks)
    copyright – the legal right to control the production and selling of a book, play, film, photograph, or piece of music (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/copyright)
    civics – the study of the way in which a local government works and of the rights and duties of the people who live in the city (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/civics)
    cancel culture – a way of behaving in a society or group, especially on social media, in which it is common to completely reject and stop supporting someone because they have said or done something that offends you (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/cancel-culture)
    big tech – refers to the major technology companies such as Apple, Google, Amazon and Facebook, which have inordinate influence (https://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/big-tech)
    digital culture – a concept that describes how technology and the internet are shaping the way that we interact as humans (https://gdsgroup.com/insights/technology/what-is-digital-culture/)
    web ring – a set of related websites that you can visit one after the other (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/web-ring)
    neocities – a free web hosting service (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neocities)
    project-based learning – a teaching method in which students learn by actively engaging in real-world and personally meaningful projects (https://www.pblworks.org/what-is-pbl)
    transferable skills – skills and abilities that are relevant and helpful across different areas of life: socially, professionally and at school (https://www.skillsyouneed.com/general/transferable-skills.html)
    critical thinking skills – the skills that we need in order to be able to think critically (https://www.skillsyouneed.com/learn/critical-thinking.html)
    iteration – the process of doing something again and again, usually to improve it, or one of the times you do it (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/iteration)
    systems thinking – a holistic approach to analysis that focuses on the way that a system’s constituent parts interrelate and how systems work over time and within the context of larger systems (https://searchcio.techtarget.com/definition/systems-thinking)
    buy-in – a situation in which a person or group buys enough shares in a company to get control of it (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/buy-in)
    prototype – the first example of something, such as a machine or other industrial product, from which all later forms are developed (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/prototype)
    student ownership – the level of investment a learner has in learning, teaching and leadership anywhere throughout the education system (https://soundout.org/2015/04/19/student-ownership/)
    curate – to pull together, sift together (https://www.dictionary.com/browse/presentation)
    standards-based grading – an intentional way for teachers to track their students’ progress and achievements while focusing on helping students learn and reach their highest potential (https://www.schoology.com/blog/standards-based-grading)
    brainstorming – an activity or business method in which a group of people meet to suggest a lot of new ideas for possible development (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/brainstorming)
    interdependence – the fact of depending on each other (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/interdependence)

  13. The Latecomers 16 November 2020

    The “alpha phase” of software development follows the early programming and design stages, but precedes the “beta phase” in which the software closely resembles the final version.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://techterms.com/definition/alpha_software”>https://techterms.com/definition/alpha_software</a>
    *Amalgam*- [countable, usually singular] amalgam (of something) (formal) a mixture or combination of things
    e.g. The film script is an amalgam of all three books.
    e.g. an amalgam of several companies and organizations
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/amalgam?q=amalgam”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/amalgam?q=amalgam</a>
    Annotate – annotate something to add notes to a book or text, giving explanations or comments
    e.g. The drawings were all clearly annotated.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/annotate?q=annotate”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/annotate?q=annotate</a>
    Appliqued – (of a piece of cloth) with small pieces of cloth sewn or stuck in a pattern on it
    e.g. an appliquéd bedspread
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/appliqued?q=appliqu%C3%A9d”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/appliqued?q=appliqu%C3%A9da>
    Assay – verb (used with object)to examine or analyze:
    e.g. to assay a situation; to assay an event.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.dictionary.com/browse/assaying”>https://www.dictionary.com/browse/assaying</a>
    Attention economy
    The theory that the attention span of online users is a limited commodity that is subject to market forces. The economic model supposes the existence of a market place in which consumers agree to give their attention in exchange for services such as email or personalized news.

    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Attention+economy”>https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Attention+economy</a>
    Autotelic – (of an activity or work of art) having a purpose or meaning simply by the fact of actually existing, being done, or having been created
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/autotelic?q=autotelic”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/autotelic?q=autotelic</a>
    Binary – a system of numbers that uses only 0 and 1
    e.g. The computer performs calculations in binary and converts the results to decimal.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/binary_1?q=binary”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/binary_1?q=binary</a>
    *Cached*- cache something to store things in a secret place, especially weapons, cache something (computing) to store data in a cache
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/cache_2?q=cached”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/cache_2?q=cached</a>
    Civics – the school subject that studies the way government works and deals with the rights and duties that you have as a citizen and a member of a particular society
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/civics?q=civics”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/civics?q=civics</a>
    Cogent -strongly and clearly expressed in a way that influences what people believe
    SYNONYM convincing
    e.g. She put forward some cogent reasons for abandoning the plan.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/cogent?q=cogent”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/cogent?q=cogent</a>
    Digital garden – The phrase “digital garden” is a metaphor for thinking about writing and creating that focuses less on the resulting “showpiece” and more on the process, care, and craft it takes to get there.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://joelhooks.com/digital-garden#::text=The%20phrase%20%22digital%20garden%22%20is%20a%20metaphor%20for,garden%20is%20usually%20a%20place%20where%20things%20grow.”>https://joelhooks.com/digital-garden#::text=The%20phrase%20%22digital%20garden%22%20is%20a%20metaphor%20for,garden%20is%20usually%20a%20place%20where%20things%20grow.</a>
    EDUPUNK -is a do it yourself (DIY) attitude to teaching and learning practices
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edupunk#::text=Edupunk%20is%20a%20do%20it%20yourself%20%28DIY%29%20attitude,%E2%80%9970s%20bands%20like%20The%20Clash%20to%20the%20classroom.%22”>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edupunk#::text=Edupunk%20is%20a%20do%20it%20yourself%20%28DIY%29%20attitude,%E2%80%9970s%20bands%20like%20The%20Clash%20to%20the%20classroom.%22</a>
    *Exposition*- [countable, uncountable] a full explanation of a theory, plan, etc.
    e.g. a clear and detailed exposition of their legal position
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/exposition?q=exposition”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/exposition?q=exposition</a>
    Federated identity – in information technology is the means of linking a person’s electronic identity and attributes, stored across multiple distinct identity management systems.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federated_identity”>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federated_identity</a>
    Flow Theory – Flow is the complete immersion in an activity that you deem enjoyable in some way. This doesn’t mean that it’s not challenging. In fact, the activity must challenge you just enough to push you.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://positivepsychology.com/theory-psychology-flow/”>https://positivepsychology.com/theory-psychology-flow/</a>
    Heyday – the time when somebody/something had most power or success, or was most popular
    SYNONYM prime
    e.g. In its heyday, the company ran trains every fifteen minutes.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/heyday?q=heyday”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/heyday?q=heyday</a>
    In the vein – If you do something in that (or this) vein, you do it in the same distinctive manner or style.<a href=“https://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/in+that+vein.html”>https://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/in+that+vein.html</a>
    IndieWeb movement – The IndieWeb is a people-focused alternative to the “corporate web”.
    <a href=“https://indieweb.org/#::text=The%20IndieWeb%20is%20a%20people%20-focused%20alternative%20to,business%20and%20lost%20all%20of%20their%20users%E2%80%99%20data.”>https://indieweb.org/#::text=The%20IndieWeb%20is%20a%20people%20-focused%20alternative%20to,business%20and%20lost%20all%20of%20their%20users%E2%80%99%20data.</a>
    Iterative (learning) – (of a process) that involves repeating a process or set of instructions again and again, each time applying it to the result of the previous stage
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/iterative?q=iterative”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/iterative?q=iterative</a>
    Longhand – ordinary writing, not typed or written in shorthand
    e.g. I prefer to write my work down in longhand first.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/longhand?q=longhand”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/longhand?q=longhand</a>
    Microblogging – the activity of sending regular short messages, photos or videos over the internet, either to a selected group of people, or so that they can be viewed by anyone, as a means of keeping people informed about your activities and thoughts
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/microblogging?q=microblogging”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/microblogging?q=microblogging</a>
    Neocities – (a portmanteau of the prefix neo- and GeoCities) is a free web hosting service.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neocities”>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neocitiesa>
    Niche – a comfortable or suitable role, job, way of life, etc.
    e.g. He eventually found his niche in sports journalism.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/niche_1?q=niche”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/niche_1?q=niche</a>
    Problem-based learning (PBL) – is a teaching method in which students learn by actively engaging in real-world and personally meaningful projects.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.pblworks.org/what-is-pbl”>https://www.pblworks.org/what-is-pbl</a>
    Pertinent – appropriate to a particular situation
    SYNONYM relevant

    e.g. a pertinent question/fact

    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/pertinent?q=pertinent”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/pertinent?q=pertinent</a>
    Phatic – relating to language used for social purposes rather than to give information or ask questions
    e.g. phatic communication
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/phatic?q=phatic”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/phatic?q=phatic</a>
    Portmanteau – is a blend of words[1] in which parts of multiple words are combined into a new word,[1][2][3] as in smog, coined by blending smoke and fog,[2][4] or motel, from motor and hotel.[5]\
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau”>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau</a>
    *Prescient*- knowing or appearing to know about things before they happen
    e.g. prescient warnings
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/prescient?q=prescient+”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/prescient?q=prescient+</a>
    Scofflaws – a person who often breaks the law but in a way that is not very serious
    Retrieved from: a href=https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/scofflaw?q=scofflaws>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/scofflaw?q=scofflaws</a>
    *Stigmergy*- The phenomenon of intelligent behavior emerging from serendipitous collaborations that occur from shared information that is deposited by many sources in a repository that is accessible to service actors and agents.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.igi-global.com/dictionary/co-creating-value-derivations-in-a-service-system-journey/28294”>https://www.igi-global.com/dictionary/co-creating-value-derivations-in-a-service-system-journey/28294</a>
    Suicide belt – The “suicide belt” is a region of the Western United States where the suicide rate is particularly high compared with the national average.
    Retreived from: <a href=“https://www.livescience.com/34470-suicide-belt.html”>https://www.livescience.com/34470-suicide-belt.html</a>
    Theosophical Movement – occult movement originating in the 19th century with roots that can be traced to ancient Gnosticism and Neoplatonism.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.britannica.com/topic/theosophy”>https://www.britannica.com/topic/theosophy</a>
    Topology – the way the parts of something are arranged and related
    e.g. The Canadian banking topology is relatively flat, with a few large banks controlling the entire market.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/topology?q=topology”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/topology?q=topology</a>
    Web rings – is a collection of websites linked together in a circular structure, and usually organized around a specific theme, often educational or social.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webring”>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webring</a>

  14. tramiz 17 November 2020

    webring (or web ring) – a collection of websites linked together in a circular structure, and usually organized around a specific theme, often educational or social
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webring”
    website – a collection of web pages and related content that is identified by a common domain name and published on at least one web server
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Website”
    web server – server software, or hardware dedicated to running this software, that can satisfy client requests on the World Wide Web
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_server”
    client – a piece of computer hardware or software that accesses a service made available by a server as part of the client–server model of computer networks
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Client_(computing)”
    client–server model – a distributed application structure that partitions tasks or workloads between the providers of a resource or service, called servers, and service requesters, called clients
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Client%E2%80%93server_model”
    server – a piece of computer hardware or software (computer program) that provides functionality for other programs or devices, called “clients”
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Server_(computing)”
    navigation bar (or navigation system) – a section of a graphical user interface intended to aid visitors in accessing information; navigation bars may include the current path, breadcrumbs, or a list of favorites
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Navigation_bar”
    path – the general form of the name of a file or directory, specifies a unique location in a file system
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Path_(computing)”
    breadcrumb or breadcrumb trail – a graphical control element frequently used as a navigational aid in user interfaces and on web pages
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breadcrumb_(navigation)”
    bookmarks – favorites or Internet shortcuts
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Favorites”
    web design – encompasses many different skills and disciplines in the production and maintenance of websites
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_design”
    web engineering – multidisciplinary and encompasses contributions from diverse areas: systems analysis and design, software engineering, hypermedia/hypertext engineering, requirements engineering, human-computer interaction, user interface, information engineering, information indexing and retrieval, testing, modelling and simulation, project management, and graphic design and presentation
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_engineering”
    web development – the work involved in developing a Web site for the Internet (World Wide Web) or an intranet (a private network)
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_development”
    the Internet – the global system of interconnected computer networks that uses the Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) to communicate between networks and devices
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet”
    intranet – a computer network for sharing information, collaboration tools, operational systems, and other computing services within an organization, usually to the exclusion of access by outsiders
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intranet”
    extranet – a controlled private network that allows access to partners, vendors and suppliers or an authorized set of customers – normally to a subset of the information accessible from an organization’s intranet
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extranet”
    computer network – a group of computers that use a set of common communication protocols over digital interconnections for the purpose of sharing resources located on or provided by the network nodes
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_network”
    node (Latin nodus, ‘knot’) is either a redistribution point or a communication endpoint
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Node_(networking)”
    communication endpoint – a type of communication network node; an interface exposed by a communicating party or by a communication channel
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communication_endpoint”
    communication protocol – a system of rules that allow two or more entities of a communications system to transmit information via any kind of variation of a physical quantity; the protocol defines the rules, syntax, semantics and synchronization of communication and possible error recovery methods; protocols may be implemented by hardware, software, or a combination of both
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communication_protocol”
    physical quantity – a property of a material or system that can be quantified by measurement; it can be expressed as the combination of a numerical value and a unit
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_quantity”
    communications system or communication system – a collection of individual telecommunications networks, transmission systems, relay stations, tributary stations, and terminal equipment usually capable of interconnection and interoperation to form an integrated whole
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communications_system”
    telecommunications network – a group of nodes interconnected by links that are used to exchange messages between the nodes; the links may use a variety of technologies based on the methodologies of circuit switching, message switching, or packet switching, to pass messages and signals
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecommunications_network”
    interconnection – the physical linking of a carrier’s network with equipment or facilities not belonging to that network; the term may refer to a connection between a carrier’s facilities and the equipment belonging to its customer, or to a connection between two or more carriers
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interconnection”
    interoperation – the setup of ad hoc components and methods to make two or more systems work together as a combined system with some partial functionality during a certain time, possibly requiring human supervision to perform necessary adjustments and corrections
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interoperation”
    link – a communication channel that connects two or more devices for the purpose of data transmission; the link may be a dedicated physical link or a virtual circuit that uses one or more physical links or shares a physical link with other telecommunications links
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Link_(telecommunications)”
    circuit switching – a method of implementing a telecommunications network in which two network nodes establish a dedicated communications channel (circuit) through the network before the nodes may communicate; the circuit guarantees the full bandwidth of the channel and remains connected for the duration of the communication session; the circuit functions as if the nodes were physically connected as with an electrical circuit; circuit switching contrasts with message switching and packet switching
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circuit_switching”
    message switching – involves messages routed in their entirety, one hop at a time; it evolved from circuit switching and was the precursor of packet switching
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Message_switching”
    packet switching – a method of grouping data that is transmitted over a digital network into packets; packets are made of a header and a payload; data in the header is used by networking hardware to direct the packet to its destination, where the payload is extracted and used by application software; packet switching is the primary basis for data communications in computer networks worldwide
    “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Packet_switching”

  15. djaks 17 November 2020

    1. SOCIAL COMMUNICATION- refers to language that is used in social situations. This refers to a child’s ability to use language to interact with others in a variety of situations. It is the ability to take the perspective of another and modify language use accordingly.
    Source: https://www.wellscreening.com/skills/social-communication#:~:text=Social%20Communication%20refers%20to%20language,Theory%20of%20Mind%2DToM).

    2. CODE-OF-CONDUCT- is a set of rules outlining the norms, rules and responsibilities or proper practices of an individual party or organization.
    Source; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_conduct

    3. PROTOTYPE- the first example of something, such as a machine or industrial product, from which all later forms are developed.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/prototype?q=prototype+

    4. CONTENT MARKETING- Content marketing is a strategic marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and consistent content to attract and retain a clearly defined audience — and, ultimately, to drive profitable customer action.
    Source: https://contentmarketinginstitute.com/what-is-content-marketing/

    5. POST-something such as a message or picture that you publish on a website or using social media.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/post

    6. SURVEY- an examination of opinions, behaviour, etc..made by asking people questions.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/survey

    7. BITE-SIZED- small or short enough to be easy to understand , remember or deal with at the same time.
    Source; https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/bite-sized?q=bite-+sized

    8. TWITTER- the name of a microblogging social media service where people or organizations can publish short remarks or pieces of information, and where you can see information published by people or organizations that you choose
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/twitter

    9. TUMBLR- is an American microblogging and social networking website , which allows its users to post multimedia and other content to a short-form blog.
    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tumblr

    10. GIF -a type of computer file that contains a still or moving image. GIF is the abbreviation for “Graphic Interchange Format”
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/gif

    11. MEME -a cultural feature or a type of behaviour that is passed from one generation to another, without the influence of genes.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/meme

    12. INFOGRAPHIC – a picture or diagram or a group of pictures or diagrams showing or explaining information
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/infographic

  16. The Latecomers 17 November 2020

    The “alpha phase” of software development follows the early programming and design stages, but precedes the “beta phase” in which the software closely resembles the final version.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://techterms.com/definition/alpha_software”>https://techterms.com/definition/alpha_software</a>

    *Amalgam*- [countable, usually singular] amalgam (of something) (formal) a mixture or combination of things
    e.g. The film script is an amalgam of all three books.
    e.g. an amalgam of several companies and organizations
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/amalgam?q=amalgam”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/amalgam?q=amalgam</a>

    Annotate – annotate something to add notes to a book or text, giving explanations or comments
    e.g. The drawings were all clearly annotated.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/annotate?q=annotate”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/annotate?q=annotate</a>

    Appliqued – (of a piece of cloth) with small pieces of cloth sewn or stuck in a pattern on it
    e.g. an appliquéd bedspread
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/appliqued?q=appliqu%C3%A9d”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/appliqued?q=appliqu%C3%A9da>

    Assay – verb (used with object)to examine or analyze:
    e.g. to assay a situation; to assay an event.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.dictionary.com/browse/assaying”>https://www.dictionary.com/browse/assaying</a>

    Attention economy
    The theory that the attention span of online users is a limited commodity that is subject to market forces. The economic model supposes the existence of a market place in which consumers agree to give their attention in exchange for services such as email or personalized news.

    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Attention+economy”>https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Attention+economy</a>

    Autotelic – (of an activity or work of art) having a purpose or meaning simply by the fact of actually existing, being done, or having been created
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/autotelic?q=autotelic”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/autotelic?q=autotelic</a>

    Binary – a system of numbers that uses only 0 and 1
    e.g. The computer performs calculations in binary and converts the results to decimal.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/binary_1?q=binary”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/binary_1?q=binary</a>

    *Cached*- cache something to store things in a secret place, especially weapons, cache something (computing) to store data in a cache
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/cache_2?q=cached”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/cache_2?q=cached</a>

    Civics – the school subject that studies the way government works and deals with the rights and duties that you have as a citizen and a member of a particular society
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/civics?q=civics”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/civics?q=civics</a>

    Cogent -strongly and clearly expressed in a way that influences what people believe
    SYNONYM convincing
    e.g. She put forward some cogent reasons for abandoning the plan.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/cogent?q=cogent”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/cogent?q=cogent</a>

    Digital garden – The phrase “digital garden” is a metaphor for thinking about writing and creating that focuses less on the resulting “showpiece” and more on the process, care, and craft it takes to get there.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://joelhooks.com/digital-garden#::text=The%20phrase%20%22digital%20garden%22%20is%20a%20metaphor%20for,garden%20is%20usually%20a%20place%20where%20things%20grow.”>https://joelhooks.com/digital-garden#::text=The%20phrase%20%22digital%20garden%22%20is%20a%20metaphor%20for,garden%20is%20usually%20a%20place%20where%20things%20grow.</a>

    EDUPUNK -is a do it yourself (DIY) attitude to teaching and learning practices
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edupunk#::text=Edupunk%20is%20a%20do%20it%20yourself%20%28DIY%29%20attitude,%E2%80%9970s%20bands%20like%20The%20Clash%20to%20the%20classroom.%22”>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edupunk#::text=Edupunk%20is%20a%20do%20it%20yourself%20%28DIY%29%20attitude,%E2%80%9970s%20bands%20like%20The%20Clash%20to%20the%20classroom.%22</a>

    *Exposition*- [countable, uncountable] a full explanation of a theory, plan, etc.
    e.g. a clear and detailed exposition of their legal position
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/exposition?q=exposition”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/exposition?q=exposition</a>

    Federated identity – in information technology is the means of linking a person’s electronic identity and attributes, stored across multiple distinct identity management systems.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federated_identity”>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federated_identity</a>

    Flow Theory – Flow is the complete immersion in an activity that you deem enjoyable in some way. This doesn’t mean that it’s not challenging. In fact, the activity must challenge you just enough to push you.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://positivepsychology.com/theory-psychology-flow/”>https://positivepsychology.com/theory-psychology-flow/</a>

    Heyday – the time when somebody/something had most power or success, or was most popular
    SYNONYM prime
    e.g. In its heyday, the company ran trains every fifteen minutes.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/heyday?q=heyday”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/heyday?q=heyday</a>

    In the vein – If you do something in that (or this) vein, you do it in the same distinctive manner or style.<a href=“https://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/in+that+vein.html”>https://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/in+that+vein.html</a>

    IndieWeb movement – The IndieWeb is a people-focused alternative to the “corporate web”.
    <a href=“https://indieweb.org/#::text=The%20IndieWeb%20is%20a%20people%20-focused%20alternative%20to,business%20and%20lost%20all%20of%20their%20users%E2%80%99%20data.”>https://indieweb.org/#::text=The%20IndieWeb%20is%20a%20people%20-focused%20alternative%20to,business%20and%20lost%20all%20of%20their%20users%E2%80%99%20data.</a>

    Iterative (learning) – (of a process) that involves repeating a process or set of instructions again and again, each time applying it to the result of the previous stage
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/iterative?q=iterative”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/iterative?q=iterative</a>

    Longhand – ordinary writing, not typed or written in shorthand
    e.g. I prefer to write my work down in longhand first.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/longhand?q=longhand”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/longhand?q=longhand</a>

    Microblogging – the activity of sending regular short messages, photos or videos over the internet, either to a selected group of people, or so that they can be viewed by anyone, as a means of keeping people informed about your activities and thoughts
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/microblogging?q=microblogging”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/microblogging?q=microblogging</a>

    Neocities – (a portmanteau of the prefix neo- and GeoCities) is a free web hosting service.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neocities”>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neocitiesa>

    Niche – a comfortable or suitable role, job, way of life, etc.
    e.g. He eventually found his niche in sports journalism.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/niche_1?q=niche”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/niche_1?q=niche</a>

    Problem-based learning (PBL) – is a teaching method in which students learn by actively engaging in real-world and personally meaningful projects.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.pblworks.org/what-is-pbl”>https://www.pblworks.org/what-is-pbl</a>

    Pertinent – appropriate to a particular situation
    SYNONYM relevant
    e.g. a pertinent question/fact
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/pertinent?q=pertinent”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/pertinent?q=pertinent</a>

    Phatic – relating to language used for social purposes rather than to give information or ask questions
    e.g. phatic communication
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/phatic?q=phatic”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/phatic?q=phatic</a>

    Portmanteau – is a blend of words[1] in which parts of multiple words are combined into a new word,[1][2][3] as in smog, coined by blending smoke and fog,[2][4] or motel, from motor and hotel.[5]\
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau”>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau</a>

    *Prescient*- knowing or appearing to know about things before they happen
    e.g. prescient warnings
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/prescient?q=prescient+”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/prescient?q=prescient+</a>

    Scofflaws – a person who often breaks the law but in a way that is not very serious
    Retrieved from: a href=https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/scofflaw?q=scofflaws>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/scofflaw?q=scofflaws</a>

    *Stigmergy*- The phenomenon of intelligent behavior emerging from serendipitous collaborations that occur from shared information that is deposited by many sources in a repository that is accessible to service actors and agents.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.igi-global.com/dictionary/co-creating-value-derivations-in-a-service-system-journey/28294”>https://www.igi-global.com/dictionary/co-creating-value-derivations-in-a-service-system-journey/28294</a>

    Suicide belt – The “suicide belt” is a region of the Western United States where the suicide rate is particularly high compared with the national average.
    Retreived from: <a href=“https://www.livescience.com/34470-suicide-belt.html”>https://www.livescience.com/34470-suicide-belt.html</a>

    Theosophical Movement – occult movement originating in the 19th century with roots that can be traced to ancient Gnosticism and Neoplatonism.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.britannica.com/topic/theosophy”>https://www.britannica.com/topic/theosophy</a>

    Topology – the way the parts of something are arranged and related
    e.g. The Canadian banking topology is relatively flat, with a few large banks controlling the entire market.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/topology?q=topology”>https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/topology?q=topology</a>

    Web rings – is a collection of websites linked together in a circular structure, and usually organized around a specific theme, often educational or social.
    Retrieved from: <a href=“https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webring”>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webring</a>

  17. jams 17 November 2020

    Digital garden = a metaphor for thinking about writing and creating that focuses less on the resulting “showpiece” and more on the process, care, and craft it takes to get there.
    Retrieved from: https://joelhooks.com/digital-garden

    Big Tech = – refers to the major technology companies such as Apple, Google, Amazon and Facebook, which have inordinate influence.
    Retrieved from: https://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/big-tech

    Digital age = the present time, in which many things are done by computer and large amounts of information are available because of computer technology.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/digital-age

    Social network = a website or computer program that allows people to communicate and share information on the internet using a computer or mobile phone.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/social-network?q=social+networks

    App = abbreviation for application; a computer program that is designed for a particular purpose.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/app

    Copyright = the legal right to control the production and selling of a book, play, film, photograph, or piece of music.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/copyright

    Civics = the study of the way in which a local government works and of the rights and duties of the people who live in the city.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/civics

    Cancel culture = a way of behaving in a society or group, especially on social media, in which it is common to completely reject and stop supporting someone because they have said or done something that offends you.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/cancel-culture

    Attention economy = the collective human capacity to engage with the many elements in our environments that demand mental focus.
    Retrieved from: https://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/attention-economy

    Web rings = a way of interlinking related Web sites so that people can visit many similar Web sites by just following the “Web ring” link on each page.
    Retrieved from: https://techterms.com/definition/webring

    IndieWeb Movement = a community of people building software to enable personal, independently hosted websites to independently maintain their social data on their own web domains rather than on large, centralized social networking services.
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IndieWeb

    NeoCities = a hosting service that gives users 10 megabytes of free space along with a basic HTML editor to create a website.
    Retrieved from: https://www.wired.com/2013/07/neocities/

    Podcasting = the preparation and distribution of audio files using RSS to the computers of subscribed users.
    Retrieved from: https://searchunifiedcommunications.techtarget.com/definition/podcasting#:~:text=Podcasting%20is%20the%20preparation%20and,from%20a%20digital%20audio%20file.

    Robust = strong and unlikely to break or fail.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/robust

    Multitude = a large number of people or things.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/multitude

    Domain = a set of websites on the internet that end with the same letters, for example .com.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/domain

    Troll = a message that someone leaves on the internet that is intended to annoy people.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/troll

    User interface = the means in which a person controls a software application or hardware device.
    Retrieved from: https://techterms.com/definition/user_interface

    Cookie-cutter = the idea of something which is not innovative in any way, that can be seen anywhere.
    Retrieved from: https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/cookie-cutter-ideas-for-hairstyling.1738948/

    Scalability = the ability of a business or system to grow larger.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/scalability

    To monetize = to change something into money, or to express something in terms of money or a currency.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/monetize

    Censorship = the act of censoring books, films, etc.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/censorship

    CMS (Content Management System) = computer software or an application that uses a database to manage all content, and it can be used when developing a website.
    Retrieved from:https://www.atinternet.com/en/glossary/cms/#:~:text=CMS%20stands%20for%20content%20management,used%20when%20developing%20a%20website.

    Webmention = a simple way to notify any URL when you mention it on your site.
    Retrieved from: https://www.w3.org/TR/webmention/#:~:text=Abstract,when%20other%20sites%20mention%20it.

    Monoculture = a culture that is the same in many different places.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/monoculture

    Code-of-conduct = a set of rules outlining the norms, rules, and responsibilities or proper practices of an individual party or an organisation.
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_conduct

    Homebrew Website Club = a growing world-wide network of meetups for everyone who wants to take back their web experience from social media silos, and own their online identities & content, or just want support with blogging.
    Retrieved from: https://indieweb.org/Homebrew_Website_Club#:~:text=Homebrew%20Website%20Club%20is%20a,just%20want%20support%20with%20blogging!

    Microblogging = posting brief and often frequent updates online. Unlike traditional blogs, which are often hosted on a custom website, microblogs are typically published on social media sites like Twitter or Facebook.
    Retrieved from: https://techterms.com/definition/microblogging#:~:text=Microblogging%20is%20posting%20brief%20and,sites%20like%20Twitter%20or%20Facebook.

  18. chickclique 18 November 2020

    1. Aggregate – total;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/aggregate)

    2. Amenable – willing to accept or be influenced by a suggestion; (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/amenable)

    3. Data void – search engine queries that turn up little to no results, especially when the query is rather obscure, or not searched often;
    (https://datasociety.net/library/data-voids/)

    4. deathbed conversion -The adoption of a particular religion when one’s death is near;
    (https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/deathbed+conversion)

    5. Edutainment -the process of entertaining people at the same time as you are teaching them something, and the products, such as television programmes or software, that do this;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/edutainment)

    6. Hallmark – a typical characteristic or feature of a person or a thing;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/hallmark)

    7. Incentive -something that encourages a person to do something;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/incentive)

    8. Head fake -an act that is designed to confuse your opponents about your plans or intentions; (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/head-fake)

    9. Morose – unhappy, annoyed, and unwilling to speak or smile;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/morose)

    10. Nebulous – (especially of ideas) not clear and having no form;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/nebulous)

    11. Polarization -the act of dividing something, especially something that contains different people or opinions, into two completely opposing groups;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/polarization)

    12. Reputable – having a good reputation and able to be trusted;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/reputable)

    13. Rupture – an occasion when something explodes, breaks, or tears;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/rupture)

    14. Sabbatical – of or relating to a sabbatical year;
    (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sabbatical)

    15. Sage (on the stage) – a teaching method where a professor imparts knowledge by lecturing to their class. Students are expected to take notes, memorize, and regurgitate this information on request with little feedback. The professor transmits their knowledge to students, who passively absorb the material;
    (https://tophat.com/glossary/s/sage-on-the-stage/)

    16. To amplify -to increase the size or effect of something;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/amplify)

    17. To chew out – to speak angrily to someone because they have done something wrong;
    (https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/chew-out)

    18. To lament – to express sadness and feeling sorry about something;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/lament)

    19. To pay the piper – To pay the consequences for self-indulgent behavior;
    (https://www.dictionary.com/browse/pay—the—piper)

    20. To unearth – to discover proof or some other information, especially after careful searching;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/unearth)

    21. . Unfettered -not limited by rules or any other controlling influence;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/unfettered)

    22. Zest – enthusiasm, eagerness, energy, and interest;
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/zest)

  19. md 18 November 2020

    procedural thinking – a disciplined method of thinking in sequence, in order and logically (https://computersciencewiki.org/index.php/Procedural_thinking)
    * ruptures* – an occasion when something explodes, breaks, or tears (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/rupture)
    culture war – a cultural conflict between social groups and the struggle for dominance of their values, beliefs, and practices (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_war)
    expressive individualism – expressive individualism holds that each person has a unique core of feeling and intuition that should unfold or be expressed if individuality is to be realized (http://facultysites.vassar.edu/lenevare/archive/2008/soci235/bellah.htm)
    critical theory – an approach to social philosophy which focuses on providing a reflective assessment and critique of society and culture in order to reveal and challenge power structures (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_theory)
    theoretical lens – theoretical frameworks provide a particular perspective, or lens, through which to examine a topic (https://ncu.libguides.com/researchprocess/theoreticalframeworks)
    ALM – abbreviated as ALM, Application Lifecycle Management refers to the capability to integrate, coordinate and manage the different phases of the software delivery process (https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/A/Application_Lifecycle_Management.html)
    antiracism – the policy of challenging racism and promoting racial equality (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/antiracism)
    sage – wise, especially as a result of great experience (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/sage)
    discourses – communication in speech or writing (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/discourse)
    national identity – a person’s identity or sense of belonging to one state or to one nation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_identity)
    fairness doctrine – a policy mandated by the Federal Communications Commission, requiring radio and television stations to grant equal time to a political candidate, group, etc., to present an opposing viewpoint to one already aired (https://www.dictionary.com/browse/fairness-doctrine)
    unbiased – able to judge fairly because you are not influenced by your own opinions (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/unbiased)
    epistemic – of or relating to knowledge or knowing (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/epistemic)
    echo chambers – a room or space in which sound echoes (= is repeated because it is reflected from the walls, etc.) (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/echo-chamber)
    polarization – the act of dividing something, especially something that contains different people or opinions, into two completely opposing groups (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/polarization)
    computational propaganda – the use of algorithms, automation, and human curation to purposefully distribute misleading information over social media networks (https://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/ATAG/2018/628284/EPRS_ATA(2018)628284_EN.pdf)
    bot – a computer program that works automatically, especially one that searches for and finds information on the internet (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/bot)
    corpus – a collection of written or spoken material stored on a computer and used to find out how language is used (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/corpus)
    communal relationships – those where an individual assumes responsibility for the welfare of his or her partner (http://psychology.iresearchnet.com/social-psychology/interpersonal-relationships/communal-relationships/)

  20. jana 19 November 2020

    Jargon – the specialized terminology associated with a particular field or area of activity.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jargon

    Bias – the action of supporting or opposing a particular person or thing in an unfair way, because of allowing personal opinions to influence your judgment
    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/bias

    ALM – Application Lifecycle Management refers to the capability to integrate, coordinate and manage the different phases of the software delivery process.
    https://www.webopedia.com/TERM/A/Application_Lifecycle_Management.html

    Antiracism – a form of action against racism and the systemic racism and the oppression of marginalized groups.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-racism

    Cancel culture – a modern form of ostracism in which someone is thrust out of social or professional circles – either online on social media, in the real world, or both. Those who are subject to this ostracism are said to be “canceled.”
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancel_culture#:~:text=Cancel%20culture%20(or%20call%2Dout,said%20to%20be%20%22canceled.%22

    Cultural discourse – a historically transmitted expressive system of communication practices, of acts, events, and styles, which are composed of specific symbols, symbolic forms, norms, and their meanings
    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17475750701737090?journalCode=rjic20#:~:text=Focused%20on%20discursive%20dynamics%2C%20cultural,1997.

    Bot – a software program that can execute commands, reply to messages, or perform routine tasks, as online searches, either automatically or with minimal human intervention (often used in combination)
    https://www.dictionary.com/browse/bot

    Epistemic bubbles – a social epistemic structure in which other relevant voices have been left out, perhaps accidentally.
    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/episteme/article/echo-chambers-and-epistemic-bubbles/5D4AC3A808C538E17C50A7C09EC706F0

    Echo chamber – an epistemic construct in which voices are actively excluded and discredited.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echo_chamber_(media)#:~:text=An%20epistemic%20bubble%20is%20an,excluded%20by%20omission%2C%20perhaps%20unintentionally.&text=On%20the%20other%20hand%2C%20an,are%20actively%20excluded%20and%20discredited.

    Great awakening – a number of periods of religious revival in American Christian history.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Awakening

    Agenda – a list of aims or possible future achievements
    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/agenda

    Rupture – the act of breaking or bursting; a breach of harmonious, friendly, or peaceful relations.
    https://www.dictionary.com/browse/rupture

    Propaganda – ideas, facts, or allegations spread deliberately to further one’s cause or to damage an opposing cause
    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/propaganda

    Nuance – a quality of something that is not easy to notice but may be important
    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/nuance

    Lateral – relating to the sides of an object or plant or to sideways movement
    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/lateral

    Confirmation Bias – the tendency to search for, interpret, favor, and recall information in a way that confirms or supports one’s prior beliefs or values.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confirmation_bias

    Reinforcement theory – a limited effects media model applicable within the realm of communication. The theory generally states that people seek out and remember information that provides cognitive support for their pre-existing attitudes and beliefs.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reinforcement_theory

    Clickbait – a form of false advertisement, uses hyperlink text or a thumbnail link that is designed to attract attention and to entice users to follow that link and read, view, or listen to the linked piece of online content, with a defining characteristic of being deceptive, typically sensationalized or misleading
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clickbait#:~:text=Clickbait%2C%20a%20form%20of%20false,deceptive%2C%20typically%20sensationalized%20or%20misleading.

    Search term – a word or combination of words or characters entered into a search engine in order to specify a particular thing to be searched for on the World Wide Web, over a computer network, or in a database.
    https://languages.oup.com/google-dictionary-en/

    Lens – a piece of transparent substance, usually glass, having two opposite surfaces either both curved or one curved and one plane, used in an optical device in changing the convergence of light rays, as for magnification, or in correcting defects of vision.
    https://www.dictionary.com/browse/lens

  21. miths 20 November 2020

    Anachronism – a thing belonging or appropriate to a period other than that in which it exists, especially a thing that is conspicuously old-fashioned

    Bogus – not genuine or true (used in a disapproving manner when deception has been attempted)

    Bot – an automated program that runs over the Internet; some bots run automatically, while others only execute commands when they receive specific input; there are many different types of bots, but some common examples include web crawlers, chat room bots, and malicious bots

    Cancel culture (or call-out culture) – a modern form of ostracism in which someone is thrust out of social or professional circles – either online on social media, in the real world, or both; those who are subject to this ostracism are said to be “cancelled”

    Censorship – the suppression or prohibition of any parts of books, films, news, etc. that are considered obscene, politically unacceptable, or a threat to security

    Clickbait – (on the internet) content whose main purpose is to attract attention and encourage visitors to click on a link to a particular web page
    Emotional clickbait – a headline which is designed to appeal directly and explicitly to the emotions of the reader

    Communal relationship – those where an individual assumes responsibility for the welfare of his or her partner

    Computational propaganda – the assemblage of social media platforms, autonomous agents, and big data tasked with the manipulation of public opinion

    Countertrend – a trend that opposes mainstream or popular trends

    Critical theory – an approach to social philosophy which focuses on providing a reflective assessment and critique of society and culture in order to reveal and challenge power structures

    Culture war – a cultural conflict between social groups and the struggle for dominance of their values, beliefs, and practices; it commonly refers to topics on which there is general societal disagreement and polarization in societal values is seen

    Curated – (of online content, merchandise, information, etc.) selected, organized, and presented using professional or expert knowledge

    Data void – coined by Michael Golebiewski of Microsoft, the term “data void” describes search engine queries that turn up little to no results, especially when the query is rather obscure, or not searched often

    Echo chamber – an epistemic construct in which voices are actively excluded and discredited; it does not suffer from a lack in connectivity; rather it depends on a manipulation of trust by methodically discrediting all outside sources; according to research conducted by the University of Pennsylvania, members of echo chambers become dependent on the sources within the chamber and highly resistant to any external sources

    Epistemic bubble – an informational network in which important sources have been excluded by omission, perhaps unintentionally; it is an impaired epistemic framework which lacks strong connectivity; members within epistemic bubbles are unaware of significant information and reasoning

    FCC fairness doctrine – a policy that required the holders of broadcast licenses to both present controversial issues of public importance and to do so in a manner that was—in the FCC’s (Federal Communications Commission) view—honest, equitable, and balanced

    Filter bubble – a situation in which an internet user encounters only information and opinions that conform to and reinforce their own beliefs, caused by algorithms that personalize an individual’s online experience

    Network capitalism – a form of capitalism driven by two main forces: Moore’s Law, which states that computing power doubles every 18 months, and Metcalfe’s Law which is about the value of a network being the square of its number of nodes; in other words, the higher the interconnectivity, the more powerful and open to even more connections the network becomes

    Niche audience – a subgroup of a company’s main targeted audience; this specific audience is a selective group of people who have specific wants, needs and interests; small but mighty, niche audiences hold great value for brands and their success

    Pageview (or pageview hit, page tracking hit) – an instance of a page being loaded (or reloaded) in a browser; pageviews is a metric defined as the total number of pages viewed

    Polarization – division into two sharply contrasting groups or sets of opinions or beliefs

    Propensity – an inclination or natural tendency to behave in a particular way

    Reputable – having a good reputation and able to be trusted

    Rupture – an occasion when something explodes, breaks, or tears

    Sage on the stage – an educator, especially at the postsecondary level, who imparts knowledge by lecturing to an audience; the method of imparting knowledge used by such an educator; sometimes mildly derogatory

    Social capital – the networks of relationships among people who live and work in a particular society, enabling that society to function effectively
    Civic engagement (or civic participation) – any individual or group activity addressing issues of public concern; civic engagement includes communities working together or individuals working alone in both political and non-political actions to protect public values or make a change in a community; the goal of civic engagement is to address public concerns and promote the quality of the community

    Soft news – information that is primarily entertaining or personally useful, primarily dealing with commentary, entertainment, arts and lifestyle
    Hard news – coverage of breaking events involving top leaders, major issues, or significant disruptions in the routines of daily life (John Zaller)

    To emulate – match or surpass (a person or achievement), typically by imitation

    To heckle – to interrupt a public speech or performance with loud, unfriendly statements or questions

  22. witspur 20 November 2020

    Web literacy – skills and competencies needed for reading, writing and participating on the web. It has been described as “both content and activity” – i.e., web users should not just learn about the web but also how to make their own website.

    Cancel culture (or call-out culture) – a modern form of ostracism in which someone is thrust out of social or professional circles – either online on social media, in the real world, or both.

    Social capital – the effective functioning of social groups through interpersonal relationships, a shared sense of identity, a shared understanding, shared norms, shared values, trust, cooperation, and reciprocity. Social capital is a measure of the value of resources, both tangible (e.g., public spaces, private property) and intangible (e.g., actors, human capital, people), and the impact that these relationships have on the resources involved in each relationship, and on larger groups. It is generally seen as a form of capital that produces public goods for a common purpose.

    Civic engagement or civic participation – any individual or group activity addressing issues of public concern.
    Civic engagement includes communities working together or individuals working alone in both political and non-political actions to protect public values or make a change in a community. The goal of civic engagement is to address public concerns and promote the quality of the community.

    Social trust – a belief in the honesty, integrity and reliability of others – a “faith in people.”

    Civic organization (or club) – any local service club, veterans’ post, fraternal society or association, volunteer fire or rescue groups, or local civic league or association of 10 or more persons not proprietary but operated exclusively for educational and charitable purposes, including the promotion of community welfare, and the net earnings are devoted exclusively to charitable, educational, recreational or social welfare purposes.

    Clickbait – a form of false advertisement, uses hyperlink text or a thumbnail link that is designed to attract attention and to entice users to follow that link and read, view, or listen to the linked piece of online content, with a defining characteristic of being deceptive, typically sensationalized or misleading.
    Data voids – search terms for which the available relevant data is limited, non-existent, or deeply problematic.

    Foucauldian terms (from http://routledgesoc.com/)

    Power-knowledge (savoir-pouvoir) – For Foucault, power and knowledge are not seen as independent entities but are inextricably related—knowledge is always an exercise of power and power always a function of knowledge.
    Discourse – an institutionalized way of speaking or writing about reality that defines what can be intelligibly thought and said about the world and what cannot.

    Discipline – a mechanism of power that regulates the thought and behavior of social actors through subtle means. In contrast to the brute, sovereign force exercised by monarchs or lords, discipline works by organizing space (e.g. the way a prison or classroom is built), time (e.g. the set times you are expected to be at work each day), and everyday activities.

    Governmentality – the “art of governing,” not simply at the level of state politics, as we generally think of it, but the governing of a wide array of objects and persons such as entire populations at the most abstract level and one’s own desires and thoughts at a more micro level

    Biopower – the policies and procedures that manage births, deaths, reproduction, and health and illness within the larger social body.

  23. Air Signs and a Sag 20 November 2020

    ‘Great awakening’ – The Great Awakening was a religious revival that impacted the English colonies in America during the 1730s and 1740s. The movement came at a time when the idea of secular rationalism was being emphasized, and passion for religion had grown stale https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.history.com/.amp/topics/british-history/great-awakening

    Agenda – 1. a list or outline of things to be considered or done
    agendas of faculty meetings 2. an underlying often ideological plan or program https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/agenda

    ALM – All Lives Matter is a slogan that has come to be associated with criticism of the Black Lives Matter movement https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Lives_Matter

    Ample – 1. generous or more than adequate in size, scope, or capacity 2. generously sufficient to satisfy a requirement or need

    Anticipate – to see what might happen in the future and take action to prepare for it https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com

    Antiracism – the policy or practice of opposing racism and promoting racial tolerance https://languages.oup.com/google-dictionary-en/

    Approach – the means or procedure for doing something. https://www.merriam-webster.com

    Auto-complete – a feature found in many computer programs (such as those used for data entry, e-mail editing, Internet searches, or word processing) that attempts to predict and automatically complete the current word or phrase as it is being entered by the program’s user https://www.merriam-webster.com

    Awareness – 1. knowing something; knowing that something exists and is important 2. interest in and concern about a particular situation or area of interest https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/awareness?q=Awareness+

    Bias – an inclination of temperament or outlook, especially : a personal and sometimes unreasoned judgment : PREJUDICE https://www.merriam-webster.com

    Biased – 1. exhibiting or characterized by bias 2. tending to yield one outcome more frequently than others in a statistical experiment
    a biased coin 3. having an expected value different from the quantity or parameter estimated
    a biased estimate https://www.merriam-webster.com

    BLM – Black Lives Matter is a decentralized political and social movement advocating for non-violent civil disobedience in protest against incidents of police brutality and all racially motivated violence against black people https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Lives_Matter

    Bots – a computer program or character (as in a game) designed to mimic the actions of a person https://www.merriam-webster.com

    Broadcast – to send out or transmit (something, such as a program) by means of radio or television or by streaming over the Internet https://www.merriam-webster.com

    Cancel culture – a modern form of ostracism in which someone is thrust out of social or professional circles – either online on social media, in the real world, or both. Those who are subject to this ostracism are said to be “canceled.” https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancel_culture

    Censorship – the institution, system, or practice of censoring https://www.merriam-webster.com

    Clickbait – something (such as a headline) designed to make readers want to click on a hyperlink especially when the link leads to content of dubious value or interest https://www.merriam-webster.com

    Common sense – sound and prudent judgment based on a simple perception of the situation or facts https://www.merriam-webster.com

    Communal relationships – a relationship in which interaction is governed primarily by consideration of the other’s needs and wishes https://dictionary.apa.org/communal-relationship

    Communication – a process by which information is exchanged between individuals through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior https://www.merriam-webster.com

    Computational propaganda – the assemblage of social media platforms, autonomous agents, and big data tasked with the manipulation of public opinion https://par.nsf.gov/servlets/purl/10021331

    Conservative – opposed to great or sudden social change; showing that you prefer traditional styles and values https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com

    Context collapse – a concept used by those academics writing about the effects of social media. It refers to the infinite audiences possible online as opposed to the limited groups a person can normally interact within face-to-face circumstances. In a limited group, a person is constantly adjusting their tone and presentation of self to fit into the social context. In a situation of context collapse, this becomes impossible. In addition, behaviours and materials intended for a limited audience can suddenly clash with parts of the wider audience they actually receive. More about context collapse online: https://www.rewire.org/context-collapse-online/

    Controversial – causing a lot of angry public discussion and disagreement https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com

    Critical theory – an approach to social philosophy which focuses on providing a reflective assessment and critique of society and culture in order to reveal and challenge power structures https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_theory

    Cultivate – cultivate something is to develop an attitude, a way of talking or behaving, etc. https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com

    Culture war – a cultural conflict between social groups and the struggle for dominance of their values, beliefs, and practices. It commonly refers to topics on which there is general societal disagreement and polarization in societal values is seen https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_war

    Curation – the selection, organization, and presentation of online content, merchandise, information, etc., typically using professional or expert knowledge https://languages.oup.com/google-dictionary-en/

    Data void – search engine queries that turn up little to no results, especially when the query is rather obscure, or not searched often https://datasociety.net/library/data-voids/

    Design thinking – design thinking is an iterative process in which we seek to understand the user, challenge assumptions, and redefine problems in an attempt to identify alternative strategies and solutions that might not be instantly apparent with our initial level of understanding https://www.interaction-design.org/literature/article/what-is-design-thinking-and-why-is-it-so-popular

    Discourse – communication in speech or writing https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/discourse

    Echo chamber – 1 .a room or space in which sound echoes (= is repeated because it is reflected from the walls, etc.) https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/echo-chamber

    2. a situation in which people only hear opinions of one type, or opinions that are similar to their own
    Engaging – pleasant, attractive, and charming https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/engaging

    Epistemic bubbles – a social epistemic structure in which other relevant voices have been left out, perhaps accidentally https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/episteme/article/echo-chambers-and-epistemic-bubbles/5D4AC3A808C538E17C50A7C09EC706F0

    Ethical – relating to beliefs about what is morally right and wrong https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/ethical

    Expertise – a high level of knowledge or skill https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/expertise

    Exploit – to use something in a way that helps you https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/exploit

    Expressive individualism – a form of individualism that arose in opposition to utilitarian individualism http://facultysites.vassar.edu/lenevare/archive/2008/soci235/bellah.htm#:~:text=Expressive%20individualism%20holds%20that%20each,persons%2C%20with%20nature%2C%20or%20with

    Extremism – the fact of someone having beliefs that most people think are unreasonable and unacceptable https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/extremism

    Fact-check – to check that all the facts in a piece of writing, a news article, a speech, etc. are correct https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fact-check

    Fairness Doctrine – a policy mandated by the Federal Communications Commission, requiring radio and television stations to grant equal time to a political candidate, group, etc., to present an opposing viewpoint to one already aired https://www.dictionary.com/browse/fairness-doctrine

    Framework – a supporting structure around which something can be built https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/framework

    Globalization – the increase of trade around the world, especially by large companies producing and trading goods in many different countries https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/globalization

    GPT3 – Generative Pre-trained Transformer 3 (GPT-3) is an autoregressive language model that uses deep learning to produce human-like text. It is the third-generation language prediction model in the GPT-n series created by OpenAI, a San Francisco-based artificial intelligence research laboratory https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPT-3#:~:text=Generative%20Pre%2Dtrained%20Transformer%203%20(GPT%2D3)%20is,based%20artificial%20intelligence%20research%20laboratory.

    GPT4 – the successor to OpenAI’s GPT-3 unsupervised Generative Pretrained Transformer (GPT) natural language processing model www.gpt-4.com

    Hannah Arendt – a German-born American political philosopher. Her many books and articles have had a lasting influence on political theory and philosophy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hannah_Arendt

    Inaction – failure to do anything that might provide a solution to a problem https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/inaction

    Incentive – something that encourages a person to do something https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/incentive

    Inclined – likely or wanting to do something https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/inclined

    Insight – (the ability to have) a clear, deep, and sometimes sudden understanding of a complicated problem or situation https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/insight

    Jargon – special words and phrases that are used by particular groups of people, especially in their work https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/jargon

    Jump to a conclusion – form an opinion or judgment hastily https://www.dictionary.com/browse/jump-to-a-conclusion?s=t

    Kalergi Plan – a far-right, anti-semitic, white nationalist conspiracy theory, which states that a plot to mix white Europeans with other races via immigration was constructed by Austrian-Japanese politician Richard von Coudenhove-Kalergi and promoted in aristocratic European social circles. The conspiracy theory is most often associated with European groups and parties, but it has also spread to North American politics https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalergi_Plan

    Language sample – a record of the words your child says spontaneously. For this assessment, it does not matter if those words are clearly spoken https://www.jtc.org/assessing-expressive-language-a-language-sample/#:~:text=A%20language%20sample%20is%20a,saying%20the%20words%20(speech).

    Laterally – towards the side https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/laterally

    Linguist – someone who studies foreign languages or can speak them very well, or someone who teaches or studies linguistics https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/linguist

    Linguistic corpus – the study of language as expressed in corpora (samples) of “real world” text https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corpus_linguistics

    Nuance – a very slight difference in appearance, meaning, sound, etc. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/nuance

    Objectivity – the fact of being based on facts and not influenced by personal beliefs or feelings https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/objectivity

    Philologist – someone who studies the history of languages, especially by looking closely at literature https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/philologist

    Philology – the study of language, especially its history and development https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/philology

    Polarization – the act of dividing something, especially something that contains different people or opinions, into two completely opposing groups https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/polarization

    Power-knowledge – a term introduced by the French philosopher Michel Foucault (French: le savoir-pouvoir). According to Foucault’s understanding, power is based on knowledge and makes use of knowledge; on the other hand, power reproduces knowledge by shaping it in accordance with its anonymous intentions https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power-knowledge

    Practices – to do work of a particular type for which a lot of training is necessary https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/practice?q=practices

    Procedural – relating to a set of actions that is the official, legal, or accepted way of doing something https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/procedural

    Propaganda – information, ideas, opinions, or images, often only giving one part of an argument, that are broadcast, published, or in some other way spread with the intention of influencing people’s opinions https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/propaganda

    Query – a question, often expressing doubt about something or looking for an answer from an authority https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/query

    Raptures – extreme pleasure and happiness or excitement https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/rapture?q=raptures

    Realism – a way of thinking and acting based on facts and what is possible, rather than on hopes for things that are unlikely to happen https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/realism

    Re-evaluate – to consider or examine something again in order to make changes or to form a new opinion about it https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/re-evaluate

    Regime – a particular government or a system or method of government https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/regime

    Relations of power/power relations – relationships in which one person has social-formative power over another, and is able to get the other person to do what they wish (whether by compelling obedience or in some less compulsive and even a more subtle way dooy.info › power

    Reliability – the quality of being able to be trusted or believed because of working or behaving well https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/reliability

    Reputable – having a good reputation and able to be trusted https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/reputable

    Reputation – the opinion that people in general have about someone or something, or how much respect or admiration someone or something receives, based on past behavior or character https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/reputation

    Sector – one of the areas into which the economic activity of a country is divided https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/sector

    Social science – the study of society and the way people live; the subjects connected with this, for example history, economics, etc. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/social-science

    Social status – a person’s standing or importance in relation to other people within a society https://www.lexico.com/definition/social_status

    Source of information – person, thing, or place from which information comes, arises, or is obtained. Information sources can be known as primary or secondary https://www.definitions.net/definition/information+source

    Strategy – a detailed plan for achieving success in situations such as war, politics, business, industry, or sport, or the skill of planning for such situations https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/strategy

    Tactic – a planned way of doing something https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/tactic

    Terms – the conditions that are part of an agreement or arrangement, or the features of an activity or idea https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/terms

    Totalitarianism – concept for a form of government or political system that prohibits opposition parties, restricts individual opposition to the state and its claims, and exercises an extremely high degree of control over public and private life https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Totalitarianism

    Translation – something that is translated, or the process of translating something, from one language to another https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/translation

    Unbiased – able to judge fairly because you are not influenced by your own opinions https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/unbiased

    Uncertainty – a situation in which something is not known, or something that is not known or certain https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/uncertainty

    Upstream – relating to an earlier stage in a process or series of events https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/upstream

    Validate – to make something officially acceptable or approved, especially after examining it https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/validate

    Verified – confirmed as to accuracy or truth by acceptable evidence, action, etc. https://www.dictionary.com/browse/verified?s=t

    Vicious circle – a situation in which effort to solve a given problem results in aggravation of the problem or the creation of a worse problem https://www.dictionary.com/browse/vicious-circle?s=ts

    Web literacy – comprises the skills and competencies needed for reading, writing and participating on the web https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_literacy

    Well-founded – based on facts https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/well-founded

  24. mmmpast 20 November 2020

    1. Agenda – a list of aims or possible future achievements.

    2. Antiracism – form of action against racism and the systemic racism and the oppression of marginalized groups.

    3. Bias – the action of supporting or opposing a particular person or thing in an unfair way, because of allowing personal opinions to influence your judgment.

    4. Bot – a computer program that works automatically, especially one that searches for and finds information on the internet.

    5. Cancel culture – a modern form of ostracism in which someone is thrust out of social or professional circles – either online on social media, in the real world, or both.

    6. Cause and effect – noting a relationship between actions or events such that one or more are the result of the other or others.

    7. Clickbait – articles, photographs, etc. on the internet that are intended to attract attention and encourage people to click on links to particular websites.

    8. Conservative – not usually liking or trusting change, especially sudden change.

    9. Context collapse – refers to the infinite audience possible online as opposed to the limited groups a person normally interacts with face to face.

    10. Corpus – a collection of written or spoken material stored on a computer and used to find out how language is used.

    11. Critical theory – an approach to social philosophy which focuses on providing a reflective assessment and critique of society and culture in order to reveal and challenge power structures.

    12. Culture wars – a cultural conflict between social groups and the struggle for dominance of their values, beliefs, and practices.

    13. Design thinking – refers to the cognitive, strategic and practical processes by which design concepts (proposals for products, buildings, machines, communications, etc.) are developed.

    14. Doctrine – a belief or set of beliefs, especially political or religious ones, that are taught and accepted by a particular group.

    15. Echo chamber – a situation in which people only hear opinions of one type, or opinions that are similar to their own.

    16. Epistemic bubble. – an informational network in which important sources have been excluded by omission, perhaps unintentionally.

    17. Expressive individualism – a form of individualism that arose in opposition to utilitarian individualism.

    18. Extremism – the fact of someone having beliefs that most people think are unreasonable and unacceptable.

    19. Fairness doctrine – a policy that required the holders of broadcast licenses to both present controversial issues of public importance and to do so in a manner that was—in the FCC’s view—honest, equitable, and balanced.

    20. Ideal – a principle or a way of behaving that is of a very high standard.

    21. Individualism – the idea that freedom of thought and action for each person is the most important quality of a society, rather than shared effort and responsibility.

    22. Insight – the power or act of seeing into a situation; the act or result of apprehending the inner nature of things or of seeing intuitively.

    23. Jargon – specialized terminology associated with a particular field or area of activity.

    24. Lateral – relating to the sides of something, or moving in a sideways direction.

    25. Lens – a piece of transparent substance, usually glass, having two opposite surfaces either both curved or one curved and one plane, used in an optical device in changing the convergence of light rays, as for magnification, or in correcting defects of vision.

    26. Mindset – a mental attitude or inclination; a fixed state of mind.

    27. Nuance – a subtle distinction or variation; a subtle quality.

    28. Polarization – the act of separating or making people separate into two groups with completely opposite opinions.

    29. Procedural thinking – a disciplined method of thinking in sequence, in order and logically.

    30. Propaganda – dissemination of information—facts, arguments, rumours, half-truths, or lies—to influence public opinion.

    31. Realism – concern for fact or reality and rejection of the impractical and visionary; a doctrine that universals exist outside the mind; a theory that objects of sense perception or cognition exist independently of the mind.

    32. Republican – a supporter of government by elected representatives of the people rather than government by a king or queen.

    33. Reputable – held in good repute; honorable; respectable; estimable.

    34. Revolt – to renounce allegiance or subjection (as to a government); rebel.

    35. Rupture – the act of breaking or bursting; a breach of harmonious, friendly, or peaceful relations.

    36. Search term – otherwise known as a search query; the word or phrase someone enters into a search engine, such as Google.

    37. Totalitarianism – a form of government that theoretically permits no individual freedom and that seeks to subordinate all aspects of individual life to the authority of the state.

  25. Tesla 20 November 2020

    Brash – Having an ostentatious or tasteless appearance.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/brash

    To exacerbate – Make (a problem, bad situation, or negative feeling) worse.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/exacerbate

    ex ante – Based on forecasts rather than actual results.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/ex_ante

    Partisan – Prejudiced in favour of a particular cause.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/partisan

    Incivility – Rude or unsociable speech or behaviour.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/incivility

    Caveat – A warning or proviso of specific stipulations, conditions, or limitations.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/caveat

    Covariates – An independent variable that can influence the outcome of a given statistical trial, but which is not of direct interest.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/covariate

    Bonferroni correction – In statistics, the Bonferroni correction is one of several methods used to counteract the problem of multiple comparisons.
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonferroni_correction

    Attrition – The process of reducing something’s strength or effectiveness through sustained attack or pressure.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/attrition

    Harbinger – A forerunner of something.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/harbinger

    Crosscurrent – A situation or tendency marked by conflict with another.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/cross-current

    Slackening – Reduce or decrease in speed or intensity.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/slacken

    Vaudeville – A type of entertainment popular chiefly in the US in the early 20th century, featuring a mixture of speciality acts such as burlesque comedy and song and dance.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/vaudeville

  26. Tesla 21 November 2020

    Brash – Having an ostentatious or tasteless appearance.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/brash
    Salacious – Having or conveying undue or inappropriate interest in sexual matters.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/salacious
    To exacerbate – Make (a problem, bad situation, or negative feeling) worse.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/exacerbate
    ex ante – Based on forecasts rather than actual results.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/ex_ante
    Partisan – Prejudiced in favour of a particular cause.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/partisan
    Incivility – Rude or unsociable speech or behaviour.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/incivility
    Caveat – A warning or proviso of specific stipulations, conditions, or limitations.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/caveat
    Covariates – An independent variable that can influence the outcome of a given statistical
    trial, but which is not of direct interest.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/covariate
    Bonferroni correction – In statistics, the Bonferroni correction is one of several methods
    used to counteract the problem of multiple comparisons.
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonferroni_correction
    Attrition – The process of reducing something’s strength or effectiveness through
    sustained attack or pressure.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/attrition
    Harbinger – A forerunner of something.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/harbinger
    Crosscurrent – A situation or tendency marked by conflict with another.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/cross-current
    Slackening – Reduce or decrease in speed or intensity.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/slacken
    Vaudeville – A type of entertainment popular chiefly in the US in the early 20th century,
    featuring a mixture of speciality acts such as burlesque comedy and song and dance.
    Retrieved from: https://www.lexico.com/definition/vaudeville

  27. plusone 21 November 2020

    Fans-1: any of various devices for winnowing grain
    2: an instrument for producing a current of air: such as
    a: a device that is held in the hand and moved back and forth to cool a person and that is usually shaped like a segment of a circle and composed of material (such as feathers or paper) mounted on thin rods or slats moving about a pivot so that the device may be closed compactly when not in use
    b: a device that consists of a series of vanes radiating from a hub rotated on its axle by a motora ceiling fan to stir the air
    cslang : an airplane propeller
    3a: something resembling an open fan (such as the leaf of certain palms)
    b: a gently sloping fan-shaped body of detritus https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fan
    Nike-in Greek mythology (= ancient stories), the goddess (= female god) of victory https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/nike?q=Nike
    Bankrupt-1a: a debtor (such as an individual or an organization) whose property is subject to voluntary or involuntary administration under the bankruptcy laws for the benefit of the debtor’s creditors
    b: a person who becomes insolvent
    2: a person who is completely lacking in a particular desirable quality or attribute https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bankrupt
    Radioactive-having or producing the energy that comes from the breaking up of atoms https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/radioactive
    Photoshop-a brand name for a computer program that allows you to make changes to a digital image https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/photoshop
    Slavery-the activity of legally owning other people who are forced to work for or obey you https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/slavery
    Bishop-a priest of high rank who is in charge of the priests of lower rank in a particular area https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/bishop

  28. djaks 22 November 2020

    1. BUREAUCRACY- a system for controlling or managing a country, company, or organization that is operated by a large number of officials employed to follow rules carefully
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/bureaucracy

    2. EMPOWERMENT-the process of gaining freedom and power to do what you want or to control what happens to you
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/empowerment

    3. INQUIRY-the process of asking a question
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/inquiry?q=INQUIRY

    4. MINDSET- a person’s way of thinking and their opinions
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/mindset?q=Mindset

    5. DESIGN THINKING- Design Thinking is an iterative process in which we seek to understand the user, challenge assumptions, and redefine problems in an attempt to identify alternative strategies and solutions that might not be instantly apparent with our initial level of understanding. At the same time, Design Thinking provides a solution-based approach to solving problems. It is a way of thinking and working as well as a collection of hands-on methods.
    Source: https://www.interaction-design.org/literature/article/what-is-design-thinking-and-why-is-it-so-popular

    6. RUPTURE- to cause something to explode, break, or tear:
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/rupture

    7. CONTROVERSY-a lot of disagreement or argument about something, usually because it affects or is important to many people
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/controversy

    8. EXPRESSIVE INDIVIDUALISM- A form of individualism that arose in opposition to utilitarian individualism. Expressive individualism holds that each person has a unique core of feeling and intuition that should unfold or be expressed if individuality is to be realized…. Under certain conditions, the expressive individualist may find it possible through intuitive feeling to “merge” with other persons, with nature, or with the cosmos as a whole.
    Source: http://facultysites.vassar.edu/lenevare/archive/2008/soci235/bellah.htm

    9. CRITICAL THEORY- is an approach to social philosophy which focuses on providing a reflective assessment and critique of society and culture in order to reveal and challenge power structures.
    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_theory

    10. ANTI-RACISM- a belief or doctrine that rejects the supremacy of one racial group over another and promotes racial equality in society.
    Source: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/antiracism

    11. INTERSECT- to cross one another
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/intersect

    12. THEORETICAL LENS- theoretical frameworks provide a particular perspective, or lenses, which are used to examine a topic.
    Source: https://ncu.libguides.com/researchprocess/theoreticalframeworks#:~:text=Theoretical%20frameworks%20provide%20a%20particular,define%20concepts%20and%20explain%20phenomena.

    13. EPISTEMIC BUBBLE- A situation where one is „unexposed“ to contrary views or information from the „other side“ .
    Source: https://wmpeople.wm.edu/asset/index/cvance/echo

    14. ECO CHAMBER- A situation where one has been conditioned to distrust contrary views or information from „the other side“ .
    Source: https://wmpeople.wm.edu/asset/index/cvance/echo

    15. EXTREMISM- the fact of someone having beliefs that most people think are unreasonable and unacceptable.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/extremism

    16. POLARIZATION-the act of dividing something, especially something that contains different people or opinions, into two completely opposing groups.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/polarization?q=polarisation+

    17. BOT-a computer program that works automatically, especially one that searches for and finds information on the internet.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/bot

    18. PROPAGANDA- information, ideas, opinions, or images, often only giving one part of an argument, that are broadcast, published, or in some other way spread with the intention of influencing people’s opinions.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/propaganda

    19. TOTALITARIANISM- a political system in which those in power have complete control and do not allow anyone to oppose them.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/totalitarianism?q=totalitarianism+
    20. FICTION- a false report or statement that you pretend is true.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fiction

    21. REALISM- a way of thinking and acting based on facts and what is possible, rather than on hopes for things that are unlikely to happen.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/realism?q=realism+

    22. COMMON SENSE- the basic level of practical knowledge and judgment that we all need to help us live in a reasonable and safe way.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/common-sense

    23. SOCIAL STATUS- is a measurement of social value.
    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_status

    24. REPUTABLE- having a good reputation and able to be trusted.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/reputable?q=reputable+

    25. VERIFY-to prove that something exists or is true, or to make certain that something is correct.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/verify?q=VERIFY

    26. SOURCE- the place something comes from or starts at, or the cause of something.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/source

    27. CLAIM- to say that something is true or is a fact, although you cannot prove it and other people might not believe it.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/claim

    28. CLICKBAIT- articles, photographs, etc. on the internet that are intended to attract attention and encourage people to click on links to particular websites.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/clickbait

    29. TRACE- to find someone or something that was lost.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/trace

    30. ACCURACY- the fact of being exact or correct.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/accuracy

    31. TACTICS- a planned way of doing something.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/tactic?q=tactics

    32. EXPERTISE- a high level of knowledge or skill.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/expertise

    33. JARGON- special words and phrases that are used by particular groups of people, especially in their work.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/jargon

    34. CONTROVERSIAL- causing disagreement or discussion.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/controversial

    35. BIAS- the action of supporting or opposing a particular person or thing in an unfair way, because of allowing personal opinions to influence your judgment.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/bias

    36. SPECIALTY-a subject that someone knows a lot about.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/specialty

    37. NUANCE- a very slight difference in appearance, meaning, sound, etc.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/nuance?q=Nuance

    38. CONTINUITY- the fact of something continuing for a long period of time without being changed or stopped.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/continuity

    39. ENGAGING- pleasant, attractive, and charming.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/engaging

    40. COMPLEXITY- the state of having many parts and being difficult to understand or find an answer to.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/complexity

    41. UNCERTAINTY- a situation in which something is not known, or something that is not known or certain.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/uncertainty

    42. CULTIVATE- to try to develop and improve something.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/cultivate

    43. ROBUST- (of a person or animal) strong and healthy, or (of an object or system) strong and unlikely to break or fail.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/robust

    44. TRUTHFULNESS- the quality of being honest and not containing or telling any lies.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/truthfulness

    45. INCENTIVE- something that encourages a person to do something.
    Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/incentive

  29. Winx 22 November 2020

    Nuance – a very slight difference in appearance, meaning, sound, etc. ( (https://www.google.com/amp/s/dictionary.cambridge.org/amp/english/nuance)
    Cancel culture- a way of behaving in a society or group, especially on social media, on which it is common to completely reject and stop suppotring someone because they have said or done something that offends you.
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/cancel-culture) Web literacy- web literacy comprises the skills and competencies needed for reading, writing and participating on the web.
    (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_literacy)
    Data- information, especially facts or numbers, collected to be examined and considered and used to help decision-making, or information in an electronic form that can be stored and used by a computer.
    (https://www.google.com/amp/s/dictionary.cambridge.org/amp/english/data)
    Internet- a large system of connected computers around the world that allows people to share information and communicate with each other.
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/internet)
    Search engine- a computer program that finds information on the Internet by looking for words that you have typed in.
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/search-engine)
    Search algorithm- a computer program that uses a set of mathematical instructions or rules to find information on the Internet or within a database.
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/search-algorithm)
    Query- a question, often expressing doubt about something or looking for an answer from an authority.
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/query)
    Website- a set of pages of information on the internet about a particular subject, published by a single person or organization.
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/website)
    Web address- an email or website address.
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/web-address)
    Agenda- a list of aims or possible future achievements.
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/agenda)
    Clickbait- article, photograph, etc. on the internet that are intended to attract attention and encourage people to click on links to particular websites.
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/clickbait)
    Digital tool- programs, websites or online resources that can make tasks easier to complete.
    (https://engage.dhsc.gov.uk/digitalpassport/tools/)
    Digital age- the present time, in which many things are done by computers and large amounts of information are available because of computer technology.
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/amp/english/digital-age)
    Bot- a computer program that works automatically, especially one that searches for and finds information on the internet.
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/bot)
    Link- a connection between documents on the internet.
    (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/link)

  30. Milena 23 November 2020

    Glossary, week 6:

    Epistemic bubble = an informational network in which important sources have been excluded by omission, perhaps unintentionally.
    (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echo_chamber_(media)#:~:text=An%20epistemic%20bubble%20is%20an,excluded%20by%20omission%2C%20perhaps%20unintentionally.&text=Relevant%20information%20has%20merely%20been,that%20they%20have%20been%20missing.)

    Echo chamber =
    1) a room or space in which sound echoes (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/echo-chamber)
    2) In news media, it is a metaphorical description of a situation in which beliefs are amplified or reinforced by communication and repetition inside a closed system and insulated from rebuttal. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echo_chamber_(media))

    Critical theory = an approach to social philosophy which focuses on providing a reflective assessment and critique of society and culture in order to reveal and challenge power structures.
    (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_theory)

    Computational propaganda = a term and phenomenon that encompasses recent digital misinformation and manipulation efforts. (http://comprop.oii.ox.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/89/2017/06/Casestudies-ExecutiveSummary.pdf)

    A bot = (short for “robot”) = an automated program that runs over the Internet. (https://techterms.com/definition/bot#:~:text=A%20bot%20(short%20for%20%22robot,room%20bots%2C%20and%20malicious%20bots.)

    Hannah Arendth (14 October 1906 – 4 December 1975) was a German-American political philosopher whose books and articles have had a lasting influence on political theory and philosophy. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hannah_Arendt)

    Kalergi Plan = The Kalergi Plan, or sometimes called the Coudenhove-Kalergi Conspiracy, is a far-right, anti-semitic, white nationalist conspiracy theory, which states that a plot to mix white Europeans with other races via immigration was constructed by Austrian-Japanese politician Richard von Coudenhove-Kalergi and promoted in aristocratic European social circles. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalergi_Plan)

  31. kat 23 November 2020

    1.procedural/design thinking -a human centred,iterative process which designers use to tackle problems.It has five stages empathize,define,ideate,prototype,test.
    *empathize-researh your user’s needs.
    *define-state your users’needs and problems
    *ideate-challenge assumptions and create ideas.
    *prototype-start to create solutions
    *test-try your solutions out
    2.culture wars-conflicts between groups with different ideals,beliefs,philosophies,etc.We can say that in the context of America “culture wars” often refer to the conflict between the conservative and more liberal values.
    3.Critical theory-an approach to social philosophy which focuses on providing a reflective assessment and critique of society and culture in order to reveal and challenge the power structure.
    4.cancel culture(or call-out-culture)-a modern form of ostracism in which someone is thrust out of social or professional circles,either online(on social media)or in real world.
    5.Fairness Doctrine-a policy mandated by the Federal Communications Commission,requiring radio and television stations to grant equal time to political candidate,group,etc..to present an opposing viewpoint to one already aired.
    6.epistemic bubbles-a situation where one is unexposed to contrary views or information from the”other side”.
    7.polarization-the process or condition of being divided into two opposing groups.
    8.bot-an autonomous program in the internet or another network that can interact with systems or users.
    9.computational propaganda-the use of algorithms,automation and human curation to purposely distribute misleading information over social media networks.
    K.T.

  32. The Latecomers 24 November 2020

    affiliation – a connection with a political party or religion, or with a larger organisation
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/affiliation

    to aggregate – to combine into a single group or total
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/aggregate

    amenable – liable to be brought to account; answerable
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/amenable

    to amplify – to increase the strength or intensity of something
    Retrieved from: https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/amplify

    anachronism – a person, thing or idea that exists out of its time in history, especially one that happened or existed later than the period being shown, discussed, etc.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/anachronism

    analogue – something that is similar or comparable to something else, either in general or in some specific detail
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/analogue

    analogy – a comparison between things that have similar features, often used to help explain a principle or idea
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/analogy

    attainment – the act of achieving something
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/attainment

    bent – a strong inclination or interest; bias
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bent

    cartelisation – the forming of a cartel
    Retrieved from: https://www.thefreedictionary.com/cartelization

    civic – of or relating to a citizen, a city, citizenship or community affairs
    civic engagement – a broad set of practices and attitudes of involvement in social and political life that converge to increase the health of a democratic society
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/civic

    civil society – a sector of society, distinct from government and business, that includes the family and the private sphere
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_society

    cognitive – of, relating to, being, or involving conscious intellectual activity (such as thinking, reasoning or remembering)
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cognitive

    consolidation – the process of uniting; the quality or state of being united
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/consolidation

    countertrend – a trend which is contrary to the established or perceived trend
    Retrieved from: https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/countertrend

    crosscurrent – a belief, method or tradition that is different from what is usual or generally accepted
    Retrieved from: https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/crosscurrent

    to decapitalise – to make difficult to have or to take away stock or wealth from
    Retrieved from: https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/decapitalize

    deleterious – harmful
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/deleterious

    a drop-by volunteer – a casual volunteer, as opposed to a regular one

    to elucidate – to explain something or make it clear
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/elucidate

    empirical – based on what is experienced or seen rather than on theory
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/empirical

    to emulate – to copy something achieved by someone else and try to do it as well as they have
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/emulate

    epiphenomenon – a secondary phenomenon accompanying another and caused by it
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/epiphenomenon

    to facilitate – to make easier; to help bring about
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/facilitate

    to forbear – to prevent oneself from doing or saying something, especially in a way that shows control, good judgement or kindness to others
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/forbear

    to foster – to encourage the development or growth of ideas or feelings
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/foster

    futile – serving no useful purpose; completely ineffective
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/futile

    glut – a supply of something that is much greater than can be sold or is needed or wanted
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/glut

    guise – pretext
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/guise

    hallmark – a distinguishing characteristic, trait or feature
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hallmark

    harbinger – a person or thing that shows that something is about to happen, especially something bad
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/harbinger

    to impinge – to encroach, to infringe
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/impinge

    litany – a sizeable series or set
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/litany

    mainline – involving beliefs, methods, etc. that are most common
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/mainline

    minute – very small; of small importance
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/minute

    nebulous – (especially of ideas) unclear and lacking form; vague
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/nebulous

    network capitalism – a form of capitalism driven by two main forces: Moore’s Law, which states that computing power doubles every eighteen months, and Metcalfe’s Law, which is about the value of a network being the square of its number of nodes, i.e. the higher the interconnectivity, the more powerful and open to even more connections the network becomes
    Retrieved from: https://blog.hackerbay.com/silicon-valley-insights-network-capitalism-d7308a01b2f3

    obliteration – the action of removing all signs of something, either by destroying it or by covering it so that it cannot be seen
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/obliteration

    to offset – to serve as a counterbalance for; to compensate
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/offset

    overt – done or shown publicly or in an obvious way
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/overt

    paleo-industrial – the paleo-industrial system refers to the current industrial system based on economics of scarcity, prior to the emergence of post-scarcity, open source economies, and in particular, prior to the emergence of open source flexible fabrication economies assisted by digital fabrication
    Retrieved from: https://wiki.opensourceecology.org/wiki/Paleoindustrial_system

    predictor – something that is helpful or useful in making an accurate prediction
    Retrieved from: https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/predictor

    premise – an idea or theory on which a statement or action is based
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/premise

    propensity – an often intense natural inclination or preference
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/propensity

    reciprocity – the quality or state of being reciprocal; mutual dependence, action or or influence
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reciprocity

    ’rent-seeking’ – an economic concept that occurs when an entity seeks to gain added wealth without any reciprocal contribution of productivity
    Retrieved from: https://www.investopedia.com/terms/r/rentseeking.asp

    secondary association – association related to entities not directly linked to the judged product, e.g. companies, countries of origin, channels of distribution, other brands and spokespersons
    Retrieved from: https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/11884/volumes/ap06/AP-06

    sentiment – a thought, opinion or idea based on a feeling about a situation, or a way of thinking about something
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/sentiment

    social capital – the effective functioning of social groups through interpersonal relationships, a shared sense of identity, a shared understanding, norms, values, trust, cooperation and reciprocity; it is generally seen as a form of capital that produces public goods for a common purpose
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_capital

    sub-national – existing or occurring below a national level; relating to or being a group or region within a nation
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/subnational

    the Sun Belt – a region of the US generally considered to stretch across the Southeast and Southwest
    Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_Belt

    to survey – to look at or examine all of something, especially carefully
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/survey

    systematic – according to an agreed set of methods or organised plan
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/systematic

    tacitly – without expressing something directly
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/tacitly

    template – a gauge, pattern or mould used as a guide to the form of a piece being made
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/template

    Tocquevillian – of or pertaining to Alexis de Tocqueville or characteristic of his democratic ideals
    Retrieved from: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Tocquevillian

    to undergird – to form the basis or foundation of; strengthen, support
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/undergird

    unfettered – not controlled or restricted
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/unfettered

    unidimensional – one-dimensional
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/unidimensional

    uniform – the same, not varying or different in any way
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/uniform

    unmoored – having little confidence and being uncertain about how one should feel or behave or what one should do
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/unmoored

    unprecedented – never having happened or existed in the past
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/unprecedented

    vaudeville – a light, often comic theatrical piece frequently combining pantomime, dialogue, dancing and song
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vaudeville

    vibrancy – the quality of being energetic, exciting and full of enthusiasm
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/vibrancy

  33. j 24 November 2020

    To curate – to be in charge of selecting and caring for objects to be shown in a museum or to form part of a collection of art, an exhibition, etc.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/curate

    Query – a question, often expressing doubt about something or looking for an answer from an authority
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/query

    To erode – to rub or be rubbed away gradually
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/erode

    Vaudeville – a type of theatre entertainment in the 1800s and early 1900s that included music, dancing, and jokes
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/vaudeville

    Scoundrel – a person, especially a man, who treats other people very badly and has no moral principles
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/scoundrel

    Deleterious – harmful
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/deleterious

    To impinge – to make an impression; have an effect or impact
    Retrieved from: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/impinge

    To emulate – to copy something achieved by someone else and try to do it as well as they have
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/emulate

    Harbinger – a person or thing that shows that something is going to happen soon, especially something bad
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/harbinger

    Propensity – the fact that someone is likely to behave in a particular way, especially a bad way
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/propensity

    To elucidate – to explain something or make something clear
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/elucidate

    Anachronism – a person, thing, or idea that exists out of its time in history, especially one that happened or existed later than the period being shown, discussed, etc.
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/anachronism

    Crosscurrent – a conflicting tendency —usually used in plural
    Retrieved from: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/crosscurrent

    Whimsical – unusual and strange in a way that might be funny or annoying
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/whimsical

    Glut – a supply of something that is much greater than can be sold or is needed or wanted
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/glut

    To unmoor – to become less involved with, connected with or influenced by something, or to make someone or something do this
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/unmoor

    Nebulous – (especially of ideas) not clear and having no form
    Retrieved from: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/nebulous



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