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#1 2020-11-23 20:18:46

nebz
Member
Registered: 2020-10-14
Posts: 9

Social Networks and Privacy

I've decided to write this post out of curiosity, inspired by an "experience" I've recently had.

Namely, having opened the Instagram app a couple of days ago (I open it many, many times a day, mindlessly), I was met with a "notification" which said that the "Data Policy" had been updated, with one of the aims of the update being to make the "Data Policy" more transparent and understandable to the platform users.
For some reason(perhaps inspired by the contents of this class, and boredom), I decided to actually read this new "Policy" on how the social-media giant uses my data. I can't say that I have a proper excuse for it being so, but I was truly amazed by just how much personal information about me Facebook platforms have my consent to collect. (If you are by some chance interested, you can find the policy I am talking about here : https://www.facebook.com/help/instagram … hc_fnav&bc)

For example, I was surprised to find that the data they gather "...can include information in or about the content you provide (like metadata), such as the location of a photo or the date a file was created. It can also include what you see through features we provide, such as our camera, so we can do things like suggest masks and filters that you might like, or give you tips on using camera formats." (why, how thoughtful of them, they want to give me tips on using camera formats!)

To the members who use these apps, how many of you knew that they have access to "what you see through their camera"?

When you make purchases through systems associated with their apps, they also have access to "payment information, such as your credit or debit card number and other card information; other account and authentication information; and billing, shipping and contact details.". - this might be commonplace knowledge (is it?), but its one more point showing that all of the information about us is readily available.

Finally, I'll be quoting another, lengthier, passage of their data policy (I apologize for doing so) in order to highlight further just how much data we provide about our surroundings, our environment, our precise and exact habits and capabilities, and numerous other things (they know not only what network we are connected to, but by which networks we are surrounded).

Device attributes: information such as the operating system, hardware and software versions, battery level, signal strength, available storage space, browser type, app and file names and types, and plugins.
Device operations: information about operations and behaviors performed on the device, such as whether a window is foregrounded or backgrounded, or mouse movements (which can help distinguish humans from bots).

Identifiers: unique identifiers, device IDs, and other identifiers, such as from games, apps or accounts you use, and Family Device IDs (or other identifiers unique to Facebook Company Products associated with the same device or account).

Device signals: Bluetooth signals, and information about nearby Wi-Fi access points, beacons, and cell towers.

Data from device settings: information you allow us to receive through device settings you turn on, such as access to your GPS location, camera or photos.

These are just some of the sub-chapters of this "deal", and just examples.

How much do you think their systems are able to triangulate out of all this data?
I have the sense that the technology involved in analyzing this information is capable of letting them know, perhaps, just where I am each day, each minute, each second.

Many of you might already be familiar with all of this, but I personally wasn't aware of the extents this data collection process goes to.

How does all of this make you feel, and do you care at all?

Last edited by nebz (2020-11-23 20:22:41)

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#2 2020-11-26 16:45:03

plusone
Member
Registered: 2020-10-27
Posts: 13

Re: Social Networks and Privacy

nebz wrote:

Many of you might already be familiar with all of this, but I personally wasn't aware of the extents this data collection process goes to.

How does all of this make you feel, and do you care at all?

Personally, we were never that much interested in Data Policy, but as we read this post, we have to say that we became curious. Because one must put into consideration that there is someone out there that knows everything about us. Therefore, a memory from my childhood came to my mind, when I first opened a Facebook account everybody told me to be careful what I post because once it was on the Internet it could never be deleted. This advice I cherished and was very attentive and let say scared when posting, and now I am using other apps (Instagram, Twitter, etc.) where I spend my time aimlessly, might I add, but with less fear and still being careful. Moreover, there are more and more memes that circle around that say that everybody has their own agent (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/507358714270209321/)
In conclusion, maybe we should use does apps but still bear in mind that they can be very dangerous.

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#3 2020-12-01 15:06:07

jelena98
Member
Registered: 2020-10-19
Posts: 6

Re: Social Networks and Privacy

We must say that our interest was piqued after reading previous comments of our peers.

nebz wrote:

I was truly amazed by just how much personal information about me Facebook platforms have my consent to collect.

Most of us use social networks or some other app that requests our personal data and we are so used to it that we just click the button that says "I agree" without even reading through it! We think it's harmless but to what exactly did we agree? Here's an article that explains to that exactly did we agree when we pressed that button for some of the most famous apps: https://www.thrillist.com/tech/nation/t … agreements
Were you aware that Netflix can disclose your information to a third party? Your information can easily be used in various ways and you could be none the wiser. Personally, as one member of this group, when I see a site that asks for my credit card info, I immediately give up and try to look for another site. I don't feel comfortable sharing that information, even though those sites might be legitimate and they will use the information given solely for the purpose of billing for a specific item that I want, I fear that the information that I've freely given can somehow be misused and some fake account could be set with it and I wouldn't know anything about it. After having our class debate on privacy, I've realized that even though I am careful in some aspects I am totally oblivious to the others. Now, I'm interested to read every Terms&Conditions Agreement that I've signed and to try not to repeat my previous mistakes. Were you inspired to change something regarding your information?

plusone wrote:

when I first opened a Facebook account everybody told me to be careful what I post because once it was on the Internet it could never be deleted. This advice I cherished and was very attentive and let say scared when posting.

,
Many were given the same advice when they first started using social networks. We are glad that our colleague took that advice to the heart and did not share an extensive amount of information about himself/herself online. But with shame in our hearts, we must confess that we did not follow that advice. Sure, when we grew up, we deleted unnecessary information about ourselves, but we did not understand the gravity of those words when we were 13 or 14 and crazed with teenage hormones. Now, we regret our decisions and pray that no one will misuse our information and pictures and everything else that we've shared. Right now, we think that we should've not been allowed to use social networks until we understood the gravity of our actions. It is our opinion that children under age 15 should not have social media. Especially because the Internet is full of predators. We want to hear your opinion on this topic.

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#4 2020-12-01 15:54:30

plusone
Member
Registered: 2020-10-27
Posts: 13

Re: Social Networks and Privacy

jelena98 wrote:
plusone wrote:

when I first opened a Facebook account everybody told me to be careful what I post because once it was on the Internet it could never be deleted. This advice I cherished and was very attentive and let say scared when posting.

,
Many were given the same advice when they first started using social networks. We are glad that our colleague took that advice to the heart and did not share an extensive amount of information about himself/herself online. But with shame in our hearts, we must confess that we did not follow that advice. Sure, when we grew up, we deleted unnecessary information about ourselves, but we did not understand the gravity of those words when we were 13 or 14 and crazed with teenage hormones. Now, we regret our decisions and pray that no one will misuse our information and pictures and everything else that we've shared. Right now, we think that we should've not been allowed to use social networks until we understood the gravity of our actions. It is our opinion that children under age 15 should not have social media. Especially because the Internet is full of predators. We want to hear your opinion on this topic.

We agree with you, but there is also the fact that a child will feel peer pressure because she/he is the only one without a social media account, thus you, as a parent, may seem too strict or it may cause a row with your child. So, our question is: what would be the smart move in this case? smile

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#5 2020-12-03 11:11:18

Prof.
Administrator
Registered: 2020-10-12
Posts: 15

Re: Social Networks and Privacy

-- Edited for clarity and to add Doctorow.

Nebz does great work applying what we are considering this semester to "real life" examples, cf.: https://interculturalextraneity.com/for … c.php?id=1
This is another example of how to engage with the material (also see similar praise in this post and the last two sentences of this post for a specific, supported approach to the topic forming the basis for thoughtful insight).
It would definitely be appropriate to link these ideas to the Zuboff or Doctorow readings here (cf. the point about weaving class readings in the Rules).

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